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Discussion Starter #1
Our son has started a kitchen refinishing job. His cabinets are oak.
He wants to sand them down and paint them. He went to Benjamin moore
and they said, it’s not good to fill in the oak wood because wood moves.

It was recommended that just to do two coats of primer and paint.

He is planning on BM paint, (spray painting on) I think the paint is called
select, not sure...

Now he does a lot of research on everything he does, He’ll fill in the wood
if it’s the best way to go...however, he wants to be happy with the final
product...

He has already added the crown molding, and moved the micro cabinet out
a couple of inches...he’s going to take down the strip lighting and replace it
with high hats, and also put pendent lights over the Island.

Also, the hinges will be replaced with euro hinges and he’ll put up door pulls.
The window over the sink is 6 ft long...he’s going to loose the vertical blinds
and do a new window treatment.

I took some pics yesterday...I personally don’t mind painted oak, but this is
a big job and he wants to get it right...

I suggested he just primes and paints one cabinet and see if he likes it, before
making the decision to fill in the wood.

Your input is appreciated.

n
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Correction, it’s Benjamin Moore “advanced” the color he wants is a light
beige/gray tint...any suggestions appreciated, Is BM the best paint for
the cabinets.
 

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Advance is a good paint grade material to refinish cabinets with.
Clean with dirtex, scuff sand 150, remove dust, prime with oil or BIN primer. 2 coats advance. Then let them cure a few days in a climate controlled area before installed.


Frames can be brushed/rolled in this product. Spraying depends on the equipment being used.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks gentlemen for the information.
I relayed it to my son, and he said, what is your
opinion on filling in the oak. He realizes that it a lot
more work, ( he said, from his research it takes a few swipes
of the filler with sanding in between each application)
but will it be a better
finished product; or is it just a personal preference?

As you can see from the pics, there are not a lot of
the characteristic cathedrals that oak has.

thanks...
 

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retired painter
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While I don't often paint finished oak I like to fill the grain when I do. IMO it makes for a nicer looking paint job. I usually only apply 1 coat of filler and then sand it all off when dry - leaving the filler just in the grain.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, Mark.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I emailed my so this morning with your recommendation and got
back this response...

“Maybe that's a good compromise. I'll do one coat of grain filler and then whatever grain shows through, so be it. Thank the pros for me, please.”

So, thank you guys for the help...when it’s finished I’ll post pics of course.
 
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retired painter
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A hint of grain helps to retain the wood look. If you completely filled the grain it would look more like metal or formica.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I’ll relay that to him, I’m sure he’ll be happy to hear this, Mark.

Also, cocomonkey he was thinking of brushing the paint on the molding,
and your suggestion sealed it :thumbsup:
 

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Just my opinion.

I would steel wool

Tack rag several times

Then two coats of paint
You need a stain blocking bonding primer before paint. And like Mark said, real steel wool is not a good idea. Maroon or green scruffy pads do the same thing, and dont leave little particles to rust.
 

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You need a stain blocking bonding primer before paint. And like Mark said, real steel wool is not a good idea. Maroon or green scruffy pads do the same thing, and dont leave little particles to rust.
That's a lot BS.

No primer is needed when a surface still has finish on it.

Cleaning the surface, wiping it down or vacuuming, then tack ragging the surface has never left steel wool on any surface I have ever done.

There's no way that stain is going to liquefy
The paint is to cover over not blend in.

Steel wool is the best idea because those pads will not be able to form to all the surfaces.
 

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While I agree a stain blocking primer probably isn't needed over prefinished wood, you still need a primer to insure good adhesion. 1 coat of primer plus 2 coats of finish is the norm when painting over poly/varnish/
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Mark, first the grain filler, right?
I emailed my son last night and asked “how it’s
going” ... he said, this weekend he got all 28 doors
and 16 drawers sanded and so far 7 of them grain filled.

He also said, it’s a lot of work.
He does have some concern that it could like a hack job...

But, everything he’s done ( DIY) in his house came out
great, so I don’t know what his concern is.
 

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retired painter
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I've always filled the grain first. As long as he sands off all the filler leaving just what's in the grain it should look fine.

There is a reason they call it sweat equity:wink2:
 

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Looks good. I would take a knife and scrape out the excess filler where the panel meets the stiles.
 
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