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Discussion Starter #1
Stupid me drove around while my cabinet door was opened and it ripped the hinge screws right out, and I need a fix. Im not super concerned with it being pretty, I just want to fix it without tearing up the frame. Im thinking about some kind of epoxy/filler/glue etc. I can inject in the holes, and clamp it in place till it sets, then use longer screws to remount the door. Any other suggestions to strengthen it, even if it isnt the prettiest?

I wish I would have used real wood now, but I didnt realize something like this would happen.

If I really need to, I could move the hinges, but I'd rather not since they are routed.
 

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Stupid me drove around while my cabinet door was opened and it ripped the hinge screws right out, and I need a fix. Im not super concerned with it being pretty, I just want to fix it without tearing up the frame. Im thinking about some kind of epoxy/filler/glue etc. I can inject in the holes, and clamp it in place till it sets, then use longer screws to remount the door. Any other suggestions to strengthen it, even if it isnt the prettiest?

I wish I would have used real wood now, but I didnt realize something like this would happen.

If I really need to, I could move the hinges, but I'd rather not since they are routed.
Stuff the holes with dowels, golf tees, toothpicks, sticks, etc, to fill them, then re-drill and mount it back.

And add some safety catches to the cabinet, to prevent the door from flopping open again.


ED
 

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Depending on how bad you screwed up, you might take the hinges off the doors and cabinets, fill the cracks and screw holes with epoxy, remount the hinges and screws, and secure it with tape until the glue sets. Then rehang the doors.
 

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The problem with dowels, golf tees, toothpicks, etc is that they are end grain wood and screws don’t hold well in end grain. Tap a plastic dry wall anchor into the hole. The screw will hold better than the original. If you have to, enlarge the hole slightly with the appropriate size drill bit for the anchor.
 

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The problem with dowels, golf tees, toothpicks, etc is that they are end grain wood and screws don’t hold well in end grain. Tap a plastic dry wall anchor into the hole. The screw will hold better than the original. If you have to, enlarge the hole slightly with the appropriate size drill bit for the anchor.
Easy remedy for end grain dowels.

Make your own inserts with a PLUG CUTTER set, and a 1X hardwood board.

Makes great cross grain plugs, and has the perfect bit to make the hole be a snug fit, for the plug, and epoxy glue.

ED
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What kind of epoxy should I use? These arent just stripped holes that I can put dowells in. I screwed up and used casing instead of real wood, so its like MDF thats way blown out. Im half tempted to cram JB weld in it, then clamp it together till its solid again.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think I have an idea after I fix it... If I use an L shaped piece of metal that wraps the edge, and around the back, I can screw it into the frame on the backside, and screw the hinge into the metal itself.
 

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Upon seeing the damage, and you stated that cosmetics are not important.

There are "mending straps", in the store, I would fashion some of those around the damaged area, to create a solid metal bracket to mount my hinges onto.

These mending strips come flat, and angled, in many sizes, that can be clamped together to make a steel box around that damage, maybe even J-B epoxy as a filler first.


ED
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So, JB weld is the way to go, or is there something that works better with wood?
 

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So, JB weld is the way to go, or is there something that works better with wood?
Not that I'm aware of.

JB weld will make the area solid, and with the addition of strengthening plates, it should not tear out again.

Use safety catches to insure that the doors stay closed when in motion.

And make it a habit to latch them before driving.


ED
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not that I'm aware of.

JB weld will make the area solid, and with the addition of strengthening plates, it should not tear out again.

Use safety catches to insure that the doors stay closed when in motion.

And make it a habit to latch them before driving.


ED
Well, yeah, now that I now what happens if I leave them open... It was pure laziness on my part. I knew it was open a little before I started driving. They have magnetic catches, and spring loaded hinges. They dont just open by themselves, but I think I will put actual catches on the opening sides now to help support the weight, now that I know a little better. I only built these cabinets a few months ago.
 

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I would use bondo. Easier to work with than epoxy. Fill the area and when it gets rubbery, use a sharp chisel to shape it. If you need to add more, just mix some more up. Dries really quick and bonds to almost anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I would use bondo. Easier to work with than epoxy. Fill the area and when it gets rubbery, use a sharp chisel to shape it. If you need to add more, just mix some more up. Dries really quick and bonds to almost anything.
Bondo would not hold a screw. Thats for cosmetic only.
 

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I haven’t had one come loose yet but that is up to you. It’s your project and no one can fault you for what you use.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So, I ended up taking a different routte... Thise trim vboards are so soft, that I took my hypodermic needle I use for wallpaper paste fixes, and filled it with wood glue, and basically stabbed it and injected wood glue in several places. After thats dry, I will fill the holes with JB weld, then I got a couple small L shaped corner braces, I will both glue, and screw into the frame from the backside and the door hinges will be mainly screwed into the metal. That outta hold it...
 
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