DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 20 of 76 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought an electrical outlet to install in an electrical junction box from Rona. I had two choices, the model costing .99 cents, or the one costing $3.00. I am just asking if there is any difference is quality and/or safety between the ones that are allegedly used by contractors costing just .99 cents and the "higher quality" ones costing $3.00.

Everything, even our world famous healthcare is potentially more expensive here in Canada.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,158 Posts
A lot of times, they break down the bulk boxes to load the pick bins. I would go with a commercial outlet if used in a kitchen, for a/v equipment or bath/wet area if downstream of a gfci. What ever you do, only use the screws to secure, not "backstabbed".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,756 Posts
The 99 cent receptacle unit is probably for at most 15 amps for each appliance plugged in. The 3 dollar unit is probably rated at 20 amps for each receptacle and probably constructed more ruggedly. It may also have easy to use connections in the back with screw down clamps that are just as reliable as the side screws.

Either will allow daisy chaining 12 gauge wires carrying 20 amps using the screw terminals or screw down terminals.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,990 Posts
the model costing .99 cents, or the one costing $3.00. I am just asking if there is any difference is quality and/or safety between the ones that are allegedly used by contractors costing just .99 cents and the "higher quality" ones costing $3.00.
Many studies have confirmed that there is no correlation between price and quality. You might as well flip a coin.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,825 Posts
Besides the clamping mechanism already mentioned often times the face material is different, the strap a heavier gauge material and the blade tension is better. All of those features increase the cost and typically the lifespan of the device.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bob22

·
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
3,368 Posts
Be wary of the more expensive one: IF you have encountered one rated CO/ALR, you are paying a premium for a device designed for direct connection to aluminum conductors. Don't buy that one unless you absolutely need it for aluminum wires.

OTOH, if you are looking at a "specification grade" vs a cheapie, you might want to go for the better one.

How about posting the manufacturer and catalog numbers so we can tell you the REAL differences?
 

·
liscenced electrician
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
there is a big difference. The cheap ones have metal that just spreads apart when you plug something in. The memory in the metal pushes the prongs back together when you unplug. The more expensive ones have a spring loaded tab that spreads apart when you plug something in. When you unplug something, the spring pushes the prongs back together. The cheap ones wear out quickly if stuff is plugged in and removed all the time. If it is for behind a clock or something, use a cheap one. If its a receptacle that's going to be used constantly for general use, buy a good one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,497 Posts
It is like the difference of door knobs on many homes as opposed to the door knobs on business, government, and school doors.

Notice the door knobs on commercial buildings are MUCH more higher quality - and also cost quite a bit more. You get what you pay for.

Same with outlets. A hotel may vacuum its rooms every single day of the year. They are plugging and unplugging the vacuum into the same outlet in each room 365 times a year. A commercial grade or industrial grade outlet will hold up to that heavy use. A cheap outlet would not last long.

FYI - There is a whole world of "commercial grade" products sold out there - Built for heavy use. You just don't see these in retail stores typically. For example search for commercial vacuum and you will see the vacuums used in hotels and businesses.

Or...
commercial locksets
commercial grade electrical receptacles
commercial grade lawnmower

Then for medical...
hospital grade receptacles

Leviton 5-20R Duplex Receptacle Hospital ...
http://www.onestopbuy.com/leviton/8300-7896.asp
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks

Thanks for the advice. My house has copper wiring, so I don't need to worry about using something compatible with aluminum wiring. Aluminum wiring hasn't been used in Canada nor the United States since the 1970s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
there is a big difference... If it is for behind a clock or something, use a cheap one. If its a receptacle that's going to be used constantly for general use, buy a good one
I've got some $0.99 back-stab receptacles which get frequent and heavy use (e.g., in my kitchen and workshop), probably should be replaced with a better unit. Can someone give a specific recommendation -- manufacturer/model # -- to look for?
 

·
Chicago, IL
Joined
·
1,037 Posts

·
liscenced electrician
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
Just go to any place that sells electrical supplies and buy a nicer one. Cheap ones range in price from like .50 to a dollar. The good ones are like 2 to 3 dollars. You should be able to feel the quality just by looking at the outside, just by looking at the outside. But the internals are different too.

Even on cheap receptacles, don't use the back stabs, ever. Wrap the wires around the screws
 

·
Boston Fan, get over it
Joined
·
32 Posts
Leviton makes a pretty good outlet. No need for an industrial grade. More money than you'll want to spend. But, I do agree with the water resistant point. Especially in a kitchen. Not required by the NEC, but a good idea.


And JV, I bet you buy cheap tools too.
 
1 - 20 of 76 Posts
Top