DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have a trane ex1000 heat pump model twr030c100a3 and during a routine maintenance i found what i think is some kind of sensor of some sort mounted at the bottom of the compressor. It's a 4-5 inch tube type sensor at the very bottom of the casing with a 2-wire regular black cord going to it.
A small wire clip that was intended to hold the sensor in place is rusted into the housing it mounts into.

There are another 3 wires mounted in the side of the compressor that i believe are the main power feed wires to the compressor. Looking straight at the main power feed box mounted on the casing of the compressor, the "sensor" is located to the right at the bottom of the casing.

However, the sensor itself has the wiring broken/burnt in half right at the sensor assembly and the other half, including the rest of the insulator and cord, is "shorted" against the harness.

Needless to say, the compressor "appears" to be working fine.

Would anybody know what the purpose and functionality of this connection is?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i guess this "Crankcase heater for the compressor" wouldnt be there if i did not need it even though the unit "appears" to work. however, how would i remove the part that is inside the casing? i cannot get in deep enough with pliers so i was thinking i could try to drive in a long screw and then pull it out; however, i am not sure if i were not to damage something else in the process. furthermore, is the crankcase heater just insterted into the tube or does it have some type of connectors inside?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,449 Posts
Like roughneck mentioned, the crankcase heater is very important during cold weather use. If you have a piston type compressor and enough liquid refrigerant collects in the sump, you can damage the compressor during startup. They are only designed to pump vapor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
here's the conclusion of this adventure:
first of all, here's a pic of a similar trane compressor that i have:
compressor.jpeg:
http://postimg.org/image/7wvcpaa8v/

where the "tube" i described and users here identified as crankcase heater socket is located in the middle, at the bottom of the casing between the two 'feet'.

trying to drive a screw into the probe (crankcase heater) didnt work because it was made of some kind of ceramic material. upon further examination using a flash light and mirror, i noticed the socket/tube is hollow. and i can use a hammer and a short shaft to punch the probe/heater out from the opposite side of the socket. it was not easy. there was not enough space and the insides of the socket were so heavily corroded that it took a while to punch the heater out.

here's a pic of the crankcase heater broken off the insulation and cord. even though the body of the heater is chrome-plated, the rust ate right through the chrome and formed a nearly permanent bond with the inside walls of the rusting socket. i guess the rust inside expanded enough to make it very difficult to dislodge the heater:

crankHeat1.jpeg:
http://postimg.org/image/urdkjpx31/

and here's a pic where the clip that holds the heater in the socket is visible. there's a grove in the body of the heater and the loose end of the clip clicks to the other side of the socket:
crankHeat2.jpeg
http://postimg.org/image/3y36x9l2p/

for what it's worth, the crankcase heater itself is rated 230v, 65w p17, part # 322873649 064
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,449 Posts
I don't know how thick the metal is but you will loose all of your freon and oil if it ever rusts through.

Water may be following the wires into the tube. Put some drip loops on the wires before they go into the tube to try and keep it dry inside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
ok, i did a quick edit of my post to hyperlink the url address and inserted attachements. the pics should be now on display
edit: will look into those drip loops! thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
yeah, the pics were taken after i flushed all the dead leafs out. there was almost 2" thick compost on the bottom of the unit and the socket with the heater was comfortably sitting in it - which kept it nicely moist to keep the rust going.. this is the first time i opened the unit in the last 16 years and it's the first time it's being serviced at all.. i dont know what the previous owner did with it but the unit itself is about 20 years old. i've never opened it before to see what's inside. i started having problems w/ the fan this week and have already done some work.. i'll post new pics later in a different thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,449 Posts
yeah, the pics were taken after i flushed all the dead leafs out. there was almost 2" thick compost on the bottom of the unit and the socket with the heater was comfortably sitting in it - which kept it nicely moist to keep the rust going.. this is the first time i opened the unit in the last 16 years and it's the first time it's being serviced at all.. i dont know what the previous owner did with it but the unit itself is about 20 years old. i've never opened it before to see what's inside. i started having problems w/ the fan this week and have already done some work.. i'll post new pics later in a different thread.
Funny, we have similar stories. I was in my 20 year old unit just last weekend replacing a bad capacitor and decided to check the amp draw on my heater. There was no reading on my amp clamp so I thought the heater was bad. I took the compressor blanket off for the first time and expected to see a band style heater wrapped around the compressor.

Turns out the insertion type that we have is like self regulating heat tape in which the power draw increases the colder it gets. It wasn't very cold here last weekend so it wasn't bad after all. The compressor is clean looking because of the blanket that covers it. The white stuff where the wires go into the heater looks like fiberglass insulation.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
must be that time of the year. i just, this thursday, replaced a capacitor for my blower that was acting up. and that didnt fix the problem. now i am looking into getting a new motor. i am sort of leery that even this may not fix the problem. i think my luck expired after 16 yrs w/ this unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
just for the sake of completeness, and for those who might need this info in the future to order the right heater for their trane compressor bh303-ee-g, 2.5 hp, 200-230v/60hz/1.

the part that i ordered and installed was "Trane HTR03384 230V 65W Sump/Crankcase Heater" which replaced the original htr-1298 and fits my trane xe1000, mod#:twr030c100a3, trane compressor bh303-ee-g, 2.5 hp, 200-230v/60hz/1.

the new heater looks slightly different. the new heater no longer has the insulator that, in my case, dried out and broke off. a search w/ these parameters: ("Trane HTR03384 230V 65W Sump/Crankcase Heater") will lead you to sellers with pricing and pics.
for what it's worth, the serial codes engraved on the htr03384 heater are as follows: zlmsa6985 5387783cbac1c, 65w 230v, d156864

the re-installation itself was not exactly easy. the receptacle was all rusted on the inside, removing the rust was laborious and tidious due to the tight and difficult access.
for the most efficient transfer of heat from the heater via the receptacle to the compressor, the body of the heater must have a tight fit in the receptacle and must be inserted all the way in, about 3". it cannot be loose or partially inserted.

the diameter of the heater is 0.380" and the receptacle probably not larger than a couple 0.001". for the insertion, it was impossible to use a hammer or pliers w/o damaging the heater's casing. fingers only. the outer material of the heater is very soft so it can be easily warped, bent, nicked or pressed into an oval.
after i cleaned the receptacle, i used 10w40 motor oil and managed to slide and jiggle the heater all the way in and secure it with the clip. it all works now. once i connected the heat pump, i could smell the 10w40 oil burning, so that was a good sign.

i was lucky that the broken heater did not lead to damaged compressor by not keeping the refrigerant in the compressor in gaseous form during cold start-ups.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top