DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all!
I am a taking on a project to create a garden shed/sunroom. It will be an independent structure, and I am using as many recycled products as I can. So far, I intend it to be 12'x14', with two entrances each facing north and south. A single man-door on the facing north, and french doors with 2' windows on either side on the south facing wall. The walls facing east & west will have two 5' slide-opening windows, and the remaining wall space will have shelves and space for wall storage.
I have a vision of semi-combining the two pictures attached. (I hope they help explain my design so far)
That being said, I have no idea how to truly blue-print-plan something like this!
I will have help building the structure from my father in law, and friends with experience, but I would like to go into this well educated. So far, these are my questions:
How much space do I need between my 5' windows? Between the corner structural posts and the windows?
How do i decide on roof slope/pitch?
How do I calculate how much roofing to budget for?
My french doors are coming without a jam, any suggestions on soling that problem (I know that can be tricky)?
How high of the ground does my wooden flooring need to be? (planning on insulating with closed-cell-styrofoam)

Any additional advice would be appreciated!
Thank you! (and I know I will have more specific questions to follow)

Katy
 

Attachments

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
18,604 Posts
The only problem I see in utilizing so much glass is that you will be sacrificing solid structural integrity for light. South wall will only have 2' of return area for structure on either side of the windows. Less if you put a space between the door and windows. I would recommend separating the windows on the french door side and on the EW sides with at least 6" of structure.

Jamb extensions are not a real problem. It is basically 1x lumber ripped to sit against the door frame and extend to the extreme of the wall covering, whether it is sheetrock or planks, etc.

Man door in front is good.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,972 Posts
A structure like that is probably best built as a pole building. Four large poles in the corners and beams joining them. Perhaps a third pole in the center of the window wall to reduce the beam size. Then all the features in the walls will not have to be load bearing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,176 Posts
Both photos will have water damages within 3-4 years. Bottom of french doors will have peeling paint within 1-2 years. Racking becomes easier to see as bottom parts of the lumber become damaged. Photo is a model built for selling such as shed, not for any long life. Even gravel ditch becomes silted and eventually no protection.
Having said that, depends on the degree of quaint cottage you want. Damages are part of life and if you're ok with that, and possibly tear it down in 10-15 years, then that photo shed can be built. Just hard for anybody here to endorse.:smile:
6x6 pressure treated lumber will give you some guarantee. Plastic siding can be installed over pt slats. Floor can be synthetic. I would leave the structure open, though. No insulation. Insulation means blocking air movement and no air movement means moisture build up. Even with chemicals and plastics, mold will always build and the smell alone will drive you out of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thank you everyone! I am so pleased to receive so much assistance!

Re: Frostline.
I like to discuss footings first on a job like that. Is there a frost line there?
I live in Washington State, almost as "top left" as you can get, in Bellingham. Though we experience some frozen ground during the winter, they are short lived. For example, we received 2"of snow overnight, and last week had high 50 degree weather.
I was intending to do concrete/rebar footings (4? 5? - still researching) and building the ground above ground level. Enough to try to keep dry, but not wanting more than a step or two. I am not opposed to having it ground level.
Another thought to follow is that we are in the watershed for a local lake. Just a piece of information that might be important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The only problem I see in utilizing so much glass is that you will be sacrificing solid structural integrity for light...
Thank you for your help!
Yes! This was a concern of mine as well. My current thought/design is to have exactly 6" in between each of the corners, windows, and door. My presumption is that that would need to be structural for sure.
What distance would you recommend on the east/west walls with the 5" wide slider windows? Would 6" be enough in between those too?
Construction has not yet begun, so changing my design is still negotiable.

Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A structure like that is probably best built as a pole building. Four large poles in the corners and beams joining them. Perhaps a third pole in the center of the window wall to reduce the beam size. Then all the features in the walls will not have to be load bearing.
Thank you!
I am familiar with pole buildings such as a barn, but I want to make sure I understand your reference in this context. Does that mean that the we would be securing one main structural cube? When you say the third pole, do you mean another beam to support the load in between the windows? (sorry, I hope that doesn't sound too primary!)

Also, when you say, 'feature', is that talking about a window?

Thank you again!
 

·
Guapo
Joined
·
5,940 Posts
I googled Washington state frost line. The answer was:
"All exterior footings shall be placed at least 12 inches (305 mm) below the undisturbed ground surface.”. Water lines have to be 12 inches below that."
If you don't go with the pole idea, I would install 12 concrete footings in 12" diameter sono tubes at the depth mentioned in that quote with the proper Simpson Strong Tie brackets to accommodate the beams. That way, you will have a strong base.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,972 Posts
When you say the third pole, do you mean another beam to support the load in between the windows?
I mean instead of just the corner posts add one mid way to break the beam span.

I am familiar with pole buildings such as a barn, but I want to make sure I understand your reference in this context.
It doesn't need to be a pole building in the typical sense that the poles are buried in the ground but more like a timber framed building where the main support is in the corner posts and header beams. The walls are not load bearing so you can put windows and doors any place you like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,975 Posts
Thickened Edge Slab is the way to go.
Your part of the world is fairly rocky.

Notice that the Corners can be deeper and wider than these dimensions to allow for the pint loads of the "timber framed" posts as per above.
And it can all be poured as a single pour. No need to pour the footing and then the slab.
Dimensions shown are representative only. They can be adjusted to suit the engineering or building codes as required.
As for the end with the door and windows, consider using one header across the entire end with smaller posts in the middle beside the door to reduce the spans. Using shorter headers above the doors and windows will allow for racking and it acts like a hinge.
The smaller spaces of the wall sections can be strengthened by using extra nails and thicker panels similar to a shear wall configuration. Also, make certain to not use 'strips' of plywood at the locations where the posts drop from the header to the floor. use wider pieces so there are no joints at the hinge spots.

Roof pitch doesn't need to be steep in your part of the world. I would think about a 5/12 would work fine. That is a 22 1/2 degree angle. Math is funny. A 12/12 is 45. but a 5/12 is 22 1/2...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
Are you intending to get a building permit? If you are in the city limits then you will need a permit if the structure is over 120 square feet. Whatcom county is more lenient, allowing a structure that is 200 square feet. Something to think about.

Personally, I wouldn't worry about a foundation too much with something like this. It's just a garden shed. No drywall to crack from building movement. I don't see the big deal if it moves a little bit. worst case you might have to shim it up a bit, but I've owned a number of such buildings over the years and never had a problem. I would not worry about frost heave in Bellingham. Mind you, if you were building something you were going to live in or required a building permit with plans, then it's a different matter altogether.

Just dig some concrete blocks below the organic layer and away you go. Now if that is too impermanent for you, or you object to having it high off of the ground, then I agree a little slab would be the way to go. Is this going to be on flat ground? If you are on a slope, then things can get complicated.

Roof pitch? Whatever you think looks good. 4/12 is practical because it can be shingled and it's easy to walk on it.

Start out by making a scaled drawing. Get some graph paper and draw at whatever scale fits on the page....4 squares to the foot or whatever. Do a top, front, and side view. Try to account for all the dimensions of the materials. Floor joists, rafters, etc. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Hi there. With all this craziness going on around the world, it came across my mind to build a shed in my back yard. Frankly speaking, I have no idea what I will come up with, but I have a vision of how I want this to look. I already found some great outdoor furniture on https://www.gardencentreshopping.co.uk/ even though the shed is not finished. I'll attach some pictures of what we've done so far and what I would like this to look like in the end. If you have any suggestions, I'll be thankful.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top