DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My current folding outfeed table has gotten pretty ratty looking over the years and I want to redo it, this time out of melamine. The original one was built out of 3/4" plywood, then covered on both sides with a white plastic laminate. The edges were also covered with plastic laminate.

So here's the question: I need to join two pieces of 3/4" melamine with a piano hinge on the underside of the table top, so the outfeed table can be folded down out of the way when it's not needed. What is the best way to secure the hinge without making a mess of the melamine? I've read that ordinary wood screws won't really hold well. I'm all ears if anybody has advice. While I'm not new to woodworking, I am new to melamine.

630984


630983
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,225 Posts
Mellamine uses particle boards and not the best material for screws. But piano hinge has many screw holes, and the table is relatively light duty, so wood screws will do fine. Use 3/4" screws for max hold. The manual says #8 but check the hinge hole sizes and use #10 or higher if possible, predrill the holes and hand tighten only. 1.5" piano hinge shouldn't be too light duty but i would switch the hinge to better quality if the hinge rod (name?) is less than 1/8".
Another way is use the bolt and nuts. Upper surface, recess the bolt heads or look for bolts called truss bolts. They have thin heads, so less recessing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,950 Posts
Glue a piece of wood to the bottom of both pieces, then screw on the hinge.
 
  • Like
Reactions: de-nagorg

·
JUSTA MEMBER
Joined
·
18,314 Posts
You mean something like these from Home Depot ? I have used similar on particle board. You pre-drill, and then they have an internal hex to drive them in. View attachment 631033

BINGO, WE HAVE A WINNER.


ED
Countersink the top for machine screws and put nuts on the hinge side.
Or countersink flat bottom holes for the nuts.
Then add a hole plug to cover the sunk head, to prevent your sawn stock from snagging.


ED
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's what I finally ended up doing: I used #6 x 3/4" Stainless Truss Head Phillips Wood Screw (100pc) 18-8 (304) Stainless Steel Screws for the piano hinge and had no issues whatsoever. I predrilled my holes, started the screws in with my fingers, then drove them with a cordless driver set on its lowest torque setting. I used a manual Philips head screwdriver to snug them up and did not overtorque a single one. Nor did I pop through the melamine on the show side of the panel.

There were four 1/4" slotted flat head bolts which held the table top to the mounting bars. I predrilled the holes from the bottom with the smallest bit That would punch through, then used a forstner bit to bury the head of the bolt on the show side of the table top, then completed the reaming of the hole from the top with a 1/4" bit. The head of the bolt is buried but the hole doesn't need any capping as nothing catches on it.

And although most videos suggested I use an oversized laminate on the melamine's edges, my Lowe's store only had 3/4" white laminate available in a 10' preglued roll. I just lined it up and taped it with some painters tape, then applied an iron on the cotton setting to make the glue permanent. You would have thought I had finished it with a router: perfect!

The hairiest part of the entire project was cutting my miter slots. I clamped the table top into position, then pushed a miter gauge up to it from the table saw's slot and marked it with a Sharpie. Then I snuck up on the slot by making repetitive cuts using just my standard crosscut blade on the table saw. I ended up with two perfect miter slots: perfect in alignment and perfect in depth. This was truly the part of the project I dreaded the most.

Here's the original:
632854


And here's the new one:
632855


632856
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top