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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I want to build a gazebo to cover my grilling area like the one in the photo. I'm out there all year long and am tired of being snowed and rained on. I don't have a problem with the framing but I am not sure about the columns. These types of post columns can be found at the major home stores and they say they are rated for 10,000 pounds but wouldn't I need something inside them to create stability. I don't see how (and can't figure out) how they properly secure these columns to the above structure and to the ground. I am in a cold zone so I need cement columns underneath. I have used these before for a porch and you can't even fit a 4"x4" inside. Seems like it could simply fall over. What am I missing here?
Any input appreciated.
Thanks in advance.


 

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old guy contractor
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Good post.
I don't think you're missing anything.
I would be concerned, too.

Soooo here's my thoughts.

Purchase the posts and see if a lally column will fit snugly inside it.
Pour your tubes with the lally sticking out of the ground 3-4'.

Set your posts down over the lallys and they shouldn't go anywhere.

Never done it to a gazebo, but did it for a Victorian porch rail.











 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Really nice looking banister! Former Mainer here from Boothbay Harbor.

Interesting, I actually did that with a pergola that I built except I used 4x4 pressure treated instead of the lally. The lally and 4x4 will fit in the post about 1/2 way up then they usually taper so you can't go all the way to the top. I have fallen out of love with the pergola and the "wooden" columns. (Too much sun has opened up all the seems. Composite next time.)

Soo, that still leaves the top which again concerns me. The columns usually have a collar that you add to the top and bottom with screws and it just seems to me that putting all that wait of the roof on top of that can be a problem.

I don't see how you would secure the (looks to be in this photo) 4x6 corners to the column securely.

Thanks for the input. Any other comments appreciated.
 

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old guy contractor
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I don't see how you would secure the (looks to be in this photo) 4x6 corners to the column securely.

Thanks for the input. Any other comments appreciated.
You're not getting rid of me that easy.....

I would work backwards with a finished trim piece that would end up being the soffit of the beams.
Fasten the "soffit" to the tops of the columns, creating your "box"
Now put all your framing members on top of that and fasten the soffit to the framing from underneath.
All your headers should be half/lapped or staggered ends cuts.

Just another idea from a crazy Mainah......:yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That makes sense.

Another issue is the top collar which is typically composite and other than the area to attach it to the column there isn't much meat to it. I attached a square 2x12 to the ones I used for the pergola. I guess I could do that again.

What is your opinion on using a PT 4x4 instead of the lally for the inside lower half? Not sure how I would attach the column to a lally.

Here is another one. I just looks like the corners on top of the columns are a bit precarious.

 

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old guy contractor
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I agree.
I think it LOOKS precarious because it looks top-heavy in it's design.
From the pic, you can't tell if the columns are anchored as you and I have discussed.

Another way would be to use multiple columns in the corners.







........or build the base up with masonry and make your columns shorter...




Just trying to think outside the box with ya :thumbsup:
 
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