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I recently moved into an 100 year old wood frame house that needs to be painted outside. I notice that most of my neighbors have to paint their houses every five years. I am not sure if it is do to paint choice, the fact that most of the houses around here have 10 layers of paint from the last several decades, or the fact that the weather is awful (as high as 100 in the summer, as low as 0 in the winter, plenty of humidity).

!!! My number one concern is to have a paint job that lasts as long as possible !!!

I want to remove ALL the old paint (most of it is flaking off anyway). From what I have read, a heat gun and a scraper is the way to go.

1. What is the best primer for my scenario?

2. Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams seem to be generally the most recommended here, but is there one or another that is best for my weather?

3. Will oil or latex help my cause, or is it irrelevant?

4. Is flat or glossy better for my situation, or is it irrelevant?

Any tips would be greatly appreciated! I love the info I am finding on this forum, but I haven't been able to find anything that pertains to my crappy climate.
 

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the Musigician
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we live in mi. too and gave up on the paint and just put on vinyl siding. no maintenance and NO PAINTING! but we always used the SW.
10 coats? who needs insulation, right? heh heh

DM
 

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If you have a 100 yr old house, chances are you have tons of lead paint on the outside. You will need to check with your jurisdiction's health department before you just wail away at it with a scraper and a heat gun.

SirWired
 

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I recently moved into an 100 year old wood frame house that needs to be painted outside. I notice that most of my neighbors have to paint their houses every five years. I am not sure if it is do to paint choice, the fact that most of the houses around here have 10 layers of paint from the last several decades, or the fact that the weather is awful (as high as 100 in the summer, as low as 0 in the winter, plenty of humidity).

!!! My number one concern is to have a paint job that lasts as long as possible !!!

I want to remove ALL the old paint (most of it is flaking off anyway). From what I have read, a heat gun and a scraper is the way to go.

1. What is the best primer for my scenario?

2. Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams seem to be generally the most recommended here, but is there one or another that is best for my weather?

3. Will oil or latex help my cause, or is it irrelevant?

4. Is flat or glossy better for my situation, or is it irrelevant?

Any tips would be greatly appreciated! I love the info I am finding on this forum, but I haven't been able to find anything that pertains to my crappy climate.
I would check out the new benjamin moore Aura line. I have not used that line yet, but I have heard great things about how it holds up and it's coverage. There is a matching primer that they sell for the Aura paint.

I've also had good luck with zissner primers. Most of the TrueValue Ezcare paints have worked remarkably well, and have been far better than box store names like behr. Interior Ezcare is very similar in look and feel to benjamin moore regal.

Jamie
 

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paint job

On the lead paint issue, definitely do not use a heat gun. And, be very careful about which painting company you use. Most will just nod their head and pretend that they care about lead paint -- then they scrape away and track it all through your yard and house and into their cars where they carry it home. Anyway, we had the inside of our house tested for lead by a certified company ($350, I believe) and it was worth it -- on the outside, it might cost less -- fewer variables. Find a painter that is certified to work with lead and know what they are doing. You will pay more, but in the end, it's worth it.
 

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I want to remove ALL the old paint (most of it is flaking off anyway). From what I have read, a heat gun and a scraper is the way to go.
No. A heat gun works well indoors. If you use one outdoors you have to wait for a perfectly calm day. Otherwise, even the slightest breeze will blow the hot air from the heat gun all over the place AND cool the surface you're trying to heat. Unless it's a perfectly calm day, using a heat gun outdoors is an exercise in futility. On a windy day, it's a completely waste of electricity.

Is flat or glossy better for my situation, or is it irrelevant?
Basically, the flatter the paint you choose, the better it will hide the underlying substrate.

Also, the kind of colour you choose will greatly affect how "colourfast" your paint is. That is, how much it fades when exposed to years of sunlight. If that is important to you, then search for posts in the Painting forum by Nestor_Kelebay with the words "organic", "inorganic", "oxide" and/or "rocks" in them and you should find posts by me explaining why the colour of the paint you choose is important in determining how much the paint fades from UV light from the Sun.
 

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Behr is pure crap. It saggs so it lacks a quality binder/resin. Doesn't cover well so it lacks pigment. I have dealt with those kind of paints before but only for the price. Behr is priced $10 a gallon too much for what it is.

Any good paint maufacturer can match any color out there.
 
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