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Hi there,

I have an electric heater(1500w) and the plug of the power cable broke. And i found a blade plug like this :
633377

and i wanted to connect this to use the heater (the original plug of the heater didn't have a ground though).
I watched a Youtube and it said, if i peel off the wire, it should have black and white sheaths but this one doesn't. Can anyone give me an advise which one should be the got wire? Thank you :)

633378
 

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If you look closely at that cable one of the two has some ridges. In the picture it looks like it might be the one on the left with the writing. That one connects to the silver neutral screw.
 

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The white lettering itself is also an indication of neutral and should go to the silver screw.
 

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The white lettering itself is also an indication of neutral and should go to the silver screw.

I never knew that I always looked for the one with the rib.

Do keep in mind that newer fans and some heaters have a fused plug for safety and should be replaced with the same.

Just in case: one can always determine the neutral wire with a simple continuity tester as a 2 wire cable almost always goes to ground.
 

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A two wire cable should not be attached to the metal frame of the device. Only the ground wire should be connected to the metal.
 

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Just in case: one can always usually determine the neutral hot wire with a simple continuity tester as since a 2 wire cable hot almost always goes to ground the switch.
The identified wire is the neutral... that can be a ribbed wire, a square edged wire, a wire with writing on it or anything else that is added over an above what a plain wire would have. Often it's the one with the wire specifications either molded or debossed in it. (and yes, debossed is a word) :)
 

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Umm, those electric heater are always a problem to be honest. I don't actually see why people are stuck with those. I am using a ceramic heater for a long time already and sure, it also has electric components, but even if something goes wrong, I can repair it myself because you know, it's not a big deal, it's not based on those electric components. Here Over Door Heaters | Air Curtains | BN Thermic you can take a look on those overdoor heaters that will simply blow your mind. You don’t have to deal with all of the technologies because everything is already set up for you!
 

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I never knew that I always looked for the one with the rib.

Do keep in mind that newer fans and some heaters have a fused plug for safety and should be replaced with the same.

Just in case: one can always determine the neutral wire with a simple continuity tester as a 2 wire cable almost always goes to ground.
But on a 2 wire cable where does the ground come from? Do you mean that the frame is connected to the neutral? That would mean that if one reversed the wires or the receptacle had reverse polarity, the frame would be hot and someone could be grounded and touch the heater frame for a surprising shock.
Likewise, aren't 2 wire appliances /tools double insulated to prevent this?
 

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BTW, OP. you only need a 2 wire male cap w/, o a ground. The quality of the 1 you chose is great.
Sorry I am talking to a old post.
 

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But on a 2 wire cable where does the ground come from? Do you mean that the frame is connected to the neutral? That would mean that if one reversed the wires or the receptacle had reverse polarity, the frame would be hot and someone could be grounded and touch the heater frame for a surprising shock.
Likewise, aren't 2 wire appliances /tools double insulated to prevent this?
On devices with 2 wire cords ( except some very old tube radios & TVs ) the metal chassis is "floating" it is not grounded to anything. Newer devices with 2 wire cords are "double-insulated" - there is no exposed metal parts on the exterior.
 
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