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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings, All. I'm wiring my bathroom vent, light, and gfci outlet, and would like to get the board's collective wisdom.

The power comes into the light. The gfci, light switch, and fan switch also come into the light. My two questions are
1. how do I wire the fan switch -- which is in a 2-gang box with the light switch?
2. how do I wire everything in the main box (at the light) so that the gfci can protect the fan?

Thanks for any tips and guidance y'all can provide.
(A handwritten "diagram" of my situation is attached.)
 

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14/3 would work from the first box to the double gang box.

BTW, you may run into box fill issues depending on the size your light box.
 

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It will be easier to bring power into the switch.

The fan only needs gfi protection if over the footprint of a tub or shower.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
14/3 would work from the first box to the double gang box.

BTW, you may run into box fill issues depending on the size your light box.
I have 14/2 running from the first box to the 2-gang. Will this still be possible?

And you're right about box fill issues. The box was already crowded before I added the fan. I will get a bigger junction box.
 

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It will be easier to bring power into the switch.

I don't think I'll be able to bring power into the switch. We have very little space above the ceiling, and pulling those wires would be nearly impossible. If I'm forced to do it, I will ... but that will take a LOT more time/labor. I'm hoping the job can still be done with power into the light?

The fan only needs gfi protection if over the footprint of a tub or shower.
In response to you and mm11: the fan is directly above the shower stall. I've read that code now requires such loads to be protected. Is this correct?
 

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A 20A dedicated circuit is required for GFCI outlets in bathrooms. You can either have the lighting and other loads on that 20A circuit or you can have a separate 15A circuit for the lighting, but the outlet(s) need to be protected by a 20A circuit.

210.11(C)(3) Bathroom Branch Circuits.
In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section , at least one 120-volt, 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply a bathroom receptacle outlet(s). Such circuits shall have no other outlets.

Exception: Where the 20-ampere circuit supplies a single bathroom, outlets for other equipment within the same bathroom shall be permitted to be supplied in accordance with 210.23(A) (1) and (A)(2).
 

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I have 14/2 running from the first box to the 2-gang. Will this still be possible?

And you're right about box fill issues. The box was already crowded before I added the fan. I will get a bigger junction box.
14/3, or 12/3, if you want the switch to control the light from the double gang box. All pros do it this way, and can help keep box fill among other things to code.
 

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A 20A dedicated circuit is required for GFCI outlets in bathrooms. You can either have the lighting and other loads on that 20A circuit or you can have a separate 15A circuit for the lighting, but the outlet(s) need to be protected by a 20A circuit.
Better read these first including the exception: 210.23(A) (1) and (A)(2)
 

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210.11 C 3 specifies the bathroom circuit. Its' exception specifically allows the single 20 amp circuit for one bathroom to allow the lights and/or fan, as long as you do not exceed the connections allowed in 210.23.

The 210.23 exception kicks in if you pick up receptacle in a second bathroom on the same bathroom circuit. Then, the lights etc in either bathroom can not be on that single 20 amp circuit.

Edit: you can read the 210.11 info in post #9
 

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If the circuit serves only one bathroom it can also serve the lights and fans.
 

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210.11 C 3 specifies the bathroom circuit. Its' exception specifically allows the single 20 amp circuit for one bathroom to allow the lights and/or fan, as long as you do not exceed the connections allowed in 210.23.

The 210.23 exception kicks in if you pick up receptacle in a second bathroom on the same bathroom circuit. Then, the lights etc in either bathroom can not be on that single 20 amp circuit.

Edit: you can read the 210.11 info in post #9
I interpret 210.23 to include a single bathroom. However I know plenty of guys have told me that they put the lights on the 20 amp outlet circuit and passed inspection.
 
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