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Contractor/Engineer
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If I proceed with this method, is there a certain size V i should remove to allow the 5/8" bow to push straight? What I'm saying is, if I just cut a 1/8" sliver, that wont allow enough movement correct? Im assuming the V will need to be pretty wide.
Make the "V" more than 3/8" wide. Heck, you can even make it two square cuts 1/2" apart that go in only 3" deep leaving a 1/2" hinge (assuming 2 X 4 studs). Then, knock the notch out with a hammer leaving the "hinge," secure the top of the new stud well from top to the notch, straighten the board and then secure it to the bottom of the original stud. Depending on how drastic the movement is you could have a nail pop on the other side of the straightened wall...so don't be terribly surprised since you're doing construction and cause has an effect you may not have wanted - but can certainly repair given the size of the job you're doing.

If you need more force to push the bottom of the new stud to plumb, simply cut a scrap a little longer than the room is wide and use that as a wedge against an opposite wall stud to persuade the new stud to plumb.

Once you get the trick you can do this all day long and not break a sweat - meanwhile, you can straighten out 12' tall walls in your sleep.
 

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That was my original idea. People have suggested a reciprocating saw, but it would bottom out. My idea was to sister a new stud and get that stud plum and even with all of the other studs along that wall. Then use the new sister stud as a guide to how much material I would need to remove from the offending stud. I'm a pretty handy guy, but home renovations are new to me and I don't know all of the tricks. I have been in the countertop industry for almost ten years.
May as well add to the confusion, lol. If you have a jig saw, drill a 3/8ths hole in the stud about an inch from the face and cut through to the back with the jig saw.
 

retired framer
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Trying to straighten a stud on an outside finished wall my mess with the siding outside.
 

retired framer
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The other option is to bow out all the other studs the same amount. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
Or just fir out all the studs 1/4" and add a straight stud to the side of this one to match,
 

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Place straight stud beside and draw a line top to bottom and either hand plane and chisel away at the edge left you can't get planed or small skill saw to remove as much as you can and chisel or grind the rest. I had to just do this to a basement bathroom that was framed in years ago and I did not notice the problem. Didn't take long and end result was great.
 

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Alright, so a few months back, we bought a new house. Downstairs there is an unfinished 1/2 bath. No flooring, no drywall on the ceiling. Just a functional toilet and sink. I'm installing a shower on the back wall and finishing it so it will now be a finished 3/4 bath. I started removing some of the drywall to add cement board and noticed just how bad the walls looked. They were very wavy so i decided to tear out all of the drywall and start from scratch. I furred out the wall on the right so all studs are plum and even with one another. The shower base needs an opening of 54" from stud to stud, which I have. The issue is, the corner stud on the left wall (see picture) is where it needs to be at the bottom (54" from opposing wall) but bows outward near the middle of the stud about 1/2"-5/8" and then returns to the correct dimension at the top. I've been racking my brain trying to come up with a solution. I don't think I can get a planer on it since it is in the corner. The best I can come up with is sistering a new stud that will be inline with the other studs along that wall. Then using that new stud as a straight edge/fence to cut just the bowed section of the wall with either a circular saw or a multi-tool. This wall is an exterior wall. Any other ideas?

Thanks
Bore a 3/4" hole about 3'-0" up and 3'-0" down right at the edge of the stud. Take hatchet or large chisel and split the bowed area out. Add a stud or just add a straight piece of lumber to the existing stud.
mike
 

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I'm pretty late to this party. I read all 33 posts...sort of skimmed through them, might have missed something, but I don't think anyone suggested a shoulder plane. Everyone here seems to use only power tools. I use them too, most of the time, but I have some of my dad's old hand tools, and I've bought more over the years, learned how to fettle a hand plane and sharpen the plane irons and chisels and (old) saws.

A shoulder plane seems like the perfect answer for your issue. It is made to plane right up to a corner or wall. A good one will set you back $150 or more (...some of them are a LOT more), but you can get a Woodstock "Shop Fox" D3750 bull-nose shoulder plane on Amazon for $50 -- It's not a snob's show-off toy, but it's a serviceable little tool. You'd almost surely have to do a bit of work on the plane iron, but it isn't too hard.

Normally a shoulder plane is used to take fairly thin shavings, it wasn't designed to hog off half an inch from an SPF stud, but if you set it to take off about three thou per stroke, 150 strokes would do it. Just remember to set the iron so it actually extends out wider than the sole by a tiny amount - it has to cut the fibers into the corner to get a truly clean cut.

Nice thing about my idea? When you're done, you have a nifty little tool that you can use for the rest of your life, and your kids' and grandkids' lives, too. I don't use mine every time I'm working on wood, but I've found a lot of uses for it. It's handy.
 
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