DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, so a few months back, we bought a new house. Downstairs there is an unfinished 1/2 bath. No flooring, no drywall on the ceiling. Just a functional toilet and sink. I'm installing a shower on the back wall and finishing it so it will now be a finished 3/4 bath. I started removing some of the drywall to add cement board and noticed just how bad the walls looked. They were very wavy so i decided to tear out all of the drywall and start from scratch. I furred out the wall on the right so all studs are plum and even with one another. The shower base needs an opening of 54" from stud to stud, which I have. The issue is, the corner stud on the left wall (see picture) is where it needs to be at the bottom (54" from opposing wall) but bows outward near the middle of the stud about 1/2"-5/8" and then returns to the correct dimension at the top. I've been racking my brain trying to come up with a solution. I don't think I can get a planer on it since it is in the corner. The best I can come up with is sistering a new stud that will be inline with the other studs along that wall. Then using that new stud as a straight edge/fence to cut just the bowed section of the wall with either a circular saw or a multi-tool. This wall is an exterior wall. Any other ideas?

Thanks
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,211 Posts
Looks like the shower pan is in place. Can you pull it back out? I would take a sawzall with a metal cutting blade, cut the nails in the bad stud, and replace it with a good one.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
44,586 Posts
Just add another straight stud beside that one and don't nail into the warped one when doing the backer board
.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,588 Posts
I might be missing something, but if the stud bows "out" as in away from the soon to be shower, why not just place a new straight stud next to the offending stud and call it a day?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nealtw

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay, so a little clarity here. the wall bows inward towards the shower, which will affect my tile. The widest part of the bow is 5/8" pretty close to the center of the stud. So basically it bows consistently from 0 (at the floor) to 5/8" (around the middle) and then back to 0 where it meets the top plate. now this wall has electrical running through it around typical outlet height. Can I take a full length sister stud, notch for the electrical, screw in to the bowed stud, and the trim away the exposed material of the bowed stud? Again, this is an exterior wall.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,588 Posts
All good ideas, but I think with the new stud in place a wide Sawzall blade kept flat against the new stud would be the quickest way. For me anyway.
 

·
Contractor/Engineer
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
Attach a 7' stud to the top section of the curved stud, that stud should project out at the bottom (follow the upper bend of the bent stud. You have to secure it well from the top down to a few inches above the notch (see the following instruction).
Cut a "V" 3/4 of the way into bent stud with the point into the wall. The notch should be at the extreme end of the curvature.
Push the previously attached stud into the wall until it is straight. It will act as a lever and push the bent stud into position using the "V" as a hinge.
Once plumb, fasten the new stud to the original to secure the wall and "heal" the notch cut.

This is a pretty common method for straightening walls...

648276
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mike Milam

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
All great suggestions. I have to rule out an electric planer because this is a corner stud and the protrusions on the side of the planer wont allow me to make a full cut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
All great suggestions. I ha to rule out an electric planer because this is a corner stud and the protrusions on the side of the planer wont allow me to make a full cut.
Attach a 7' stud to the top section of the curved stud, that stud should project out at the bottom (follow the upper bend of the bent stud. You have to secure it well from the top down to a few inches above the notch (see the following instruction).
Cut a "V" 3/4 of the way into bent stud with the point into the wall. The notch should be at the extreme end of the curvature.
Push the previously attached stud into the wall until it is straight. It will act as a lever and push the bent stud into position using the "V" as a hinge.
Once plumb, fasten the new stud to the original to secure the wall and "heal" the notch cut.

This is a pretty common method for straightening walls...

View attachment 648276
If I proceed with this method, is there a certain size V i should remove to allow the 5/8" bow to push straight? What I'm saying is, if I just cut a 1/8" sliver, that wont allow enough movement correct? Im assuming the V will need to be pretty wide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,085 Posts
All great suggestions. I have to rule out an electric planer because this is a corner stud and the protrusions on the side of the planer wont allow me to make a full cut.
How about using a straight stud as a guide, per above, and using an oscillating tool to cut the bow out of the offending stud? Would take a while, and probably a handful of blades.
648281
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
44,586 Posts
Draw the straight line and cut a much as you can with a skill saw. I would have said circular saw but we need some skill here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
How about using a straight stud as a guide, per above, and using an oscillating tool to cut the bow out of the offending stud? Would take a while, and probably a handful of blades.
View attachment 648281
That was my original idea. People have suggested a reciprocating saw, but it would bottom out. My idea was to sister a new stud and get that stud plum and even with all of the other studs along that wall. Then use the new sister stud as a guide to how much material I would need to remove from the offending stud. I'm a pretty handy guy, but home renovations are new to me and I don't know all of the tricks. I have been in the countertop industry for almost ten years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This is the last major hurdle I need to get over before I can start all of the finish work. I hired an electrician to run lines for some additional lighting and do some work on the adjacent room. I hired a plumber to run plumbing to the shower and to install P-trap and insure the shower rough-in was vented properly. I do not want to hire a contractor to correct one annoying stud. We also remodeled the adjacent room, and we are quite a bit over our original budget already, which is realistic, but again, I need to take care of this stud myself.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top