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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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With projects that appearance didn't matter much i've cut multiple saw kerfs about 3/4 the way though the thickness then screw or glue a straight piece to it to draw it back straighter. Another choice may be to replace that piece but finding one of better quality is a crap shoot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Since it's bolted together with those metal pieces, how did it get out of alignment in the first place? And why did it do it in the same location on both doors? Why did it do it only on the bottom left? Just curious if you know why? I know wood bows but I didn't think it happened once it was attached to something.
Thank you for turning my images. :)
 

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Since it's bolted together with those metal pieces, how did it get out of alignment in the first place?

So I found something called a turnbuckle...looking into that.
It doesn't look like the corner braces, or using a turnbuckle to support it diagonally, or anything to do with it's mounting is the issue. Just the latch side board that warped when it dried out. Senior offers a couple solutions for the warped boards, I can't think of anything different without adding too much weight.
 

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Wood warps and your latch is on the top 1/3 of the door allowing the bottom 2/3 to do as it pleases. If the latch was in the center of the door it would have a better chance.

In the old days, screen doors had these on them to keep them shut. Maybe your doors need a couple of them.

A turnbuckle is going to raise the door as you tighten it.
 

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A turnbuckle is to help correct racking and won't help in this situation. The metal pieces you suggested, in the 4 corners your carpenter installed, aids in preventing racking. He did a good job there. Sagging is a different matter, as in the 4 corners stay square but the perimeter gaps become un-equal.



Why both doors warped out at the bottom. There could be a couple of reasons and one is nature does that to lumber because the tree is mad we cut it down.:vs_laugh: Second reason is the carpenter ripped the two boards from a wider board that came from that same mad tree.


EDIT: EDIT:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So I need 3 latches on each door?
Also on the other door, i just have a latch hook on the inside of the door, do I have to put 3 latch hooks , which seems so silly. Could you put a metal plate on the stiles to hold them straight..I mean how do they keep regular doors from warping?
 

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Ask your carpenter to replace those 2 stiles with lumber that doesn't warp. Hopefully he'll agree.

To correct the warp, STRUT material screwed to those stiles may work but not in-expensive.
Pictured is what i mentioned earlier about cutting a series of saw kerfs a couple inches apart ( or maybe closer ? ) This can be done accurately with a little jig ingenuity and a portable saw, then glue a couple of straight 1x2's to the inside ( kerf side ). When i was a kid i straightened 2 ft. x 4 ft. plywood cabinet doors for a porch cabinet with saw kerfs and 2 lengths of 3/4" angle iron.


EDIT: EDIT:
 

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Is the right side of the jamb (where the door is mounted) secure so that it cant move? Because if that side can wiggle back and forth, it would throw the door out of whack. We assume the door is warped, but this is the other thing to check.
 

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I'm talking about the post that the hinges are screwed to. If you push on that with your foot from the outside when the door is closed, is it solid or does it move back and forth? Because if it is free to move, that affects the way the door closes.
 
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