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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My house has corrugated stainless steel tubing (csst) for the natural gas system, and csst seems to have some vulnerability to lightning strikes. Specifically, a lightning strike can occur *near* your home (not on your home) and “energize” the underground natural gas system. The electricity flows through the underground system to your gas meter, hits the csst run, ruptures it, and creates a flamethrower. It seems this was not a concern with black pipe as it is strong enough not to rupture. CSST is weaker and can rupture.

The fix for this vulnerability is to electrically bond the csst. The technical bulletin on this states that a number 6 bonding wire should be clamped on the meter (assuming the meter is outside the house which in my case is true), specifically on either the last brass fitting before the csst run begins, or on the black pipe immediately before the fitting. See: http://www.proflexcsst.com/html/English/Bonding.html

The question I have is: Where can the other end of the bonding wire go?

The bulletin says: “This can be achieved through a connection to the electrical service equipment enclosure, the grounded conductor at the electrical service, the grounding electrode conductor (where of sufficient size) or to the one or more grounding electrodes used.” I have an older house (built in the early 70s) and I’m not sure I actually have any of those things. The entire “grounding system” of my old house appears to be a grounding wire that emerges from the electrical service panel and is clamped onto a cold water pipe in the laundry room.

In my case it’s not practical to try to run the bonding wire from the meter into the house – I’d like to implement a solution that’s entirely outside the house.

I was thinking of driving a two-foot length of rebar into the ground near the meter and clamping the other end of the bonding wire to that. Would that work in the event of a nearby lightning strike? If not, what would? Do I need a longer piece of rebar? Or an 8ft copper grounding rod? Or two? Or maybe clamp the bonding wire to the cold water hose spigot on the side of the house? Or something else?

All ideas are welcome. Thanks!
 

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#6 over to the electrical service GND. rebar? no, get a 8ft GND spike from HD or the like, drive that into the ground (not into the gas line) and also tie the #6 to that.

if its not already, the gas co's should use dialectic union to help prevent such issue.

something like this for the gas pipe bond clamp





and this clamp for the gnd rod
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply! Confused on one thing, though. So one end of the number six wire is clamped to the csst fitting at the meter. Got that. Does the other end clamp to the 8ft rod I'm going to get from Home Depot or is there another connection that I need to make?
 

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yes, the gnd rod has a clamp. use one long piece of #6 copper. start on meter, loop under the GND rod clamp, continue on to the electrical service GND (might need a clamp there too, or you use the GND bar in the electrical panel to terminate the #6 wire). this brings the gas piping (local area) down to earth potential and a path for stray electric to run into the ground vs through piping, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have to check, but I'm pretty sure that my house's electrical service has no ground rod. The electrical panel is bonded to the cold water service.

So I suppose I could run the ground wire from the gas meter, then to the grounding rod I'm going to buy from home depot, and then clamp it onto the nearest cold water pipe. Would that work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So it sounds like:

1) Clamp #6 wire to csst fitting at gas meter...
2) Pound a ground rod into the earth and clamp the wire to that, then...
3) Continue the wire to the ground/neutral bar at the service panel and screw it in there.

Right?

Also, any difference between stranded #6 or solid?
 

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If you were to drive a rod you would need to bond it to all the other electrodes in the system. It cannot be a standalone rod.
 
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If you were to drive a rod you would need to bond it to all the other electrodes in the system. It cannot be a standalone rod.
the electrical panel is bonded to the water pipe, would you need to bring the #6 solid wire to the water pipe, or would the bonded link between gnd terminal bar and water pipe suffice? they would all be bonded together.
 

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i didnt see where 250 says the bonding wire has to be continuous between electrodes.
IIRC, there can be splices but they must be permanent in nature, i.e., crimped or similar connection that cannot be disassembled. Local inspectors may allow you to use a bolt-clamp type connector if the head of the bolt is hacksawed off after assembly.
 

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IIRC, there can be splices but they must be permanent in nature, i.e., crimped or similar connection that cannot be disassembled. Local inspectors may allow you to use a bolt-clamp type connector if the head of the bolt is hacksawed off after assembly.
i didnt mean a splice between say the gnd rod and the end point. between two items should be continuous #6, etc. what i meant was, #6 between water pipe and panel gnd bus, and then another #6 that starts at gas pipe, loops through the connector on gnd rod and then continues on to panel gnd bus. thus, all continuous #6 between end points, and, its all bonded together.
 
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