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Good morning all,
I have an existing dock with 220V service for a marine style electrical box that has (4) 50 amp receptacles. All 4 have breakers. My concerns are:
Now I'm permitted to install a lift which is 70 feet away from the box and the lift being a 16K everything calculated to using a 220v service to my new lift. The lift control box is a Gem
Remote

It is my second Gem and the original box had a GFI but now Gem does not include the GFI. I would also like to add a 110V courtesy receptacle next to the box for boat service work. So my question is:
1) Do I need a quick disconnect before the marine box or do the breakers replace that need?
2) How would you wire the GFI and 110 receptacle at the GEM box for a nice tiddy look?
The gauge of wire necessary to keep my amperage down was 4AWG. So I have (2) 4AWG positive power supply (1) 4AWG neutral and (1) 6AWG ground wire. And now it's time to make all the connections and be within code and safe practices.
Thanks again for any help.
j
 

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First, I very, very strongly recommend GFCI protection for anything dockside. That GFCI protection should be at the earliest point that is feasible - preferably well before you actually reach dockside.

You need a disconnect within sight distance and within 70' or so of the lift. The reason is to protect mechanics servicing the lift. It needs to be in sight so someone turning it back on has the chance to turn head and look to see that the mechanic is working on it. Experience has shown this protects workers, and lockout/tagout does not (because workers don't do it).

Any breaker can serve as a disconnect (as long as it's in the right place).

Because I strongly recommend GFCI, I recommend the 50A circuit to the boat lift be protected by a 2-pole GFCI breaker.

Now, here's the problem:

You can't put a 15A receptacle on a 50A breaker. Can't do it.

What you'll need to do is have a subpanel that has a 50A breaker and a 15A breaker (20A would also be allowed), each breaker feeding its thing. This subpanel might be right at the boat lift -- hey, weren't we just talking about a local disconnect for the boat lift?

2 birds, 1 stone. Yay!

For connecting #4 wire you'll need a Polaris connector, use the smallest size (#4-14 I believe) - that means the #4 insulation will fit snug to the plastic.

I would put the GFCI breaker at the far end - at the supply end of the #4 wire. Then at this local "at the lift" 15/50 panel, I would use plain breakers and a plain receptacle, and a "GFCI Protected" sticker on the receptacle so you don't get written up for a violation.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
First, I very, very strongly recommend GFCI protection for anything dockside. That GFCI protection should be at the earliest point that is feasible - preferably well before you actually reach dockside.

You need a disconnect within sight distance and within 70' or so of the lift. The reason is to protect mechanics servicing the lift. It needs to be in sight so someone turning it back on has the chance to turn head and look to see that the mechanic is working on it. Experience has shown this protects workers, and lockout/tagout does not (because workers don't do it).

Any breaker can serve as a disconnect (as long as it's in the right place).

Because I strongly recommend GFCI, I recommend the 50A circuit to the boat lift be protected by a 2-pole GFCI breaker.

Now, here's the problem:

You can't put a 15A receptacle on a 50A breaker. Can't do it.

What you'll need to do is have a subpanel that has a 50A breaker and a 15A breaker (20A would also be allowed), each breaker feeding its thing. This subpanel might be right at the boat lift -- hey, weren't we just talking about a local disconnect for the boat lift?

2 birds, 1 stone. Yay!

For connecting #4 wire you'll need a Polaris connector, use the smallest size (#4-14 I believe) - that means the #4 insulation will fit snug to the plastic.

I would put the GFCI breaker at the far end - at the supply end of the #4 wire. Then at this local "at the lift" 15/50 panel, I would use plain breakers and a plain receptacle, and a "GFCI Protected" sticker on the receptacle so you don't get written up for a violation.
Thanks seharper,
I'm going to look up all those parts and make a drawing for your review. If it looks good I'll start the purchasing process. Back soon.
 
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