DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an area of currently unfinished basement I want to convert to a climate controlled environment.

It won't be "finished" per se, like a true living space. It will be something of a shop, but for computers and guns (with storage for both), so it's got to be super dry. It will be painted and I'll put down an interlocking garage floor.

It's bounded on two sides by being largely below grade, and the other two sides by finished rooms which are actually insulated against this area. I've been experimenting with just running a dehumidifier, and that may be enough. Even in the second wettest GA summer on record, it's cool, dry and comfortable. If I decide later to open up a register and a return, it will just be a minor hack to existing ducting.

But I have four of these guys.



Even though I have it most of the way to where I want it, dryness-wise, there's no reason to fight those, energywise. At first I assumed I'd shoot triple expanding foam in there and scrape it off flush, but the can says "cracks up to 3", and those holes are more like 6".

What's the accepted way of blocking these off a little more elegantly than the previous owner's newspaper solution?.

Thanks for looking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,175 Posts
The best way would be to cut out the block and replace with a new one laying like all the other ones where laid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,997 Posts
The best way may be to do it like you would insulating a rim joist. Put in layers of 2 inch foam board using spray foam around the edges to seal them. You would also be better off waterproofing the outside in some way. What is the finish and the rest of your house foundation on the exterior side?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks MsRadell - I had kind of arrived at cut-to-shape foam as well, possibly finished for appearance by putting a piece of board over it and painting that along with the wall.

The exterior of the lower part of the house is brick. There's an external vent in the brick, and then there's a gap between the brick and the block. With that air gap. I assumed I'd want to leave the exterior vent open.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,997 Posts
Yes, leaving the outside vent through the brick open would probably look the best and shouldn't cause any problems. Instead of using a board over the inside you could leave the foam about 1/2 inch below the surface and stucco it to be level. That would be a little more work but might look better depending on your preferences.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top