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A decent paint job will save the siding, at least for use as a barn. Might not be good enough for use as a living space but that depends more on what's underneath.

Metal dries quickly and bare wood is slow to dry so in your case might get wood done first.

Roofing/windows is another topic but looks as tho it was a good looking structure at one time.

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I wouldn't bother going crazy stripping that wood. This is one of those jobs perfect for never peels or similar product.
Also true. If you can get one coat of Coverstain or equivalent up there before the siding's soaked you'll have time to paint/repair as weather and your schedule permit. 5 gals ~$200usd and you'll probably need two of them.

12" drywall knife, sanding pad, 1 pack of 40grit paper, a really long extension pole and frame with lambswool cover is probably another $200. Not much else can be done that inexpensively to dramatically improve your barn.

You might give it a shot and if it works out it may change your perspective on whether it's worth it to invest more in this structure or not.

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Yes, if you paint instead of stain it's best to apply a coat of exterior oil base wood primer. It will adhere and seal the wood better than latex will. Latex house paint will adhere fine to the oil primer once it has dried.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Turns out the sale wasn't that great at the local shop as the regular price was kinda high. Went to Home Depot later and they had a better deal.

My extension ladder is not the straightest thing in the world and the ground around the barn is kinda bumpy. Had a sketchy moment while painting the upper door track. Today I learned that I may be able to get a scissor lift for next to nothing sometime in the Spring. So I think I'm just going to do the doors before winter and wait till spring to do the rest. A scissor lift seems like it would make things waaaaay easier.

Pictures are attached of the upper door which has its plywood sheets splayed out from each other. I tried putting in some screws last year to hold everything together, but they eventually popped out.

I guess I'll change the split piece of wood that's between the 2 plywood sheets at the bottom of the door and put some extra long screws? What would you guys do for a decent fix?
 

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retired painter
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While I've used scissor lifts on concrete I don't recall using one on top of soil - not sure I'd want to. It's not uncommon to scratch out a little dirt or add a scotch to make a ladder set level.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Hmmm.. Well there was a large bobcat that travelled around this barn for years, lifting its bucket to store straw bails in the upper area of the barn. So I figure the ground isn't too soft where the scissor lift would be.

Bobcat is still at the farm, but has some sort of hydraulic leak.
 

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If you use a scissor lift make sure there are two nice flat/level tracts for the wheels to ride on and don't drive while elevated. Once you're comfortable with the platforms levelness, raise it.

Can you gorilla glue your door back together? Maybe use some scrap 1x4s and clamps to put even pressure on a long section.

Be very mindful of working on the extension ladder. Often you can find used ladder standoffs/stabilizers in local online listings. Pick some up for your ladder and you'll be able to resell all that stuff once your jobs complete. Good ladders and ladder equipment sell themselves. All people hate deacceleration sickness.

Also, and I can't stress this enough, invest in some good extension poles and get as much work done from the ground as you can. Even the scraping. It will be faster and safer so it's a win win situation.
 

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Taking peeling paint off wood is one of the great mysteries and frustrations of life for me. I have seen painters take whole houses down to bare wood. I know it's possible, but I haven't found anything that would be remotely efficient. I've tried various sanders and sand paper, heat guns, chemicals, wire wheels, wire brushes, scrapers, paint eater, soda blasting... I have tinkered with everything on the internet for the past ten years. Nothing works.
 

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3500 psi minimum, pressure washer . . . mine will remove paint that I didn't even know was loose . . . and water is cheap!
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Thanks guys.

Is it best to put 2 coats of primer then a top coat, or 1 coat of primer and 2 top coats. I'm just putting primer on the wood doors this year. Are 2 coats of anything necessary?

Some of the ground at the front and back of barn has a concrete pad (see image). The ground can get pretty wet back there in the Spring time. I guess I'll have to wait till summer for a scissor lift. I'll consult with the lift owner before borrowing, thank you for the heads up.

Will try to do as much as possible from the ground next year.

The plywood sheathing on the barn is quite old, wouldn't a pressure washer damage a layer?
 

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retired painter
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1 coat primer and 2 coats finish is always best. The 2nd coat of finish can sometimes be optional.
A pressure washer is a great tool but care must be used as too much pressure [too close, wrong tip] can cause damage.
 
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