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Discussion Starter #1
Have a few wood doors and a barn face (see images) that should be primed & re-painted. Anyone have experience taking old paint off wood?

Best method to do so? I have a wire wheel cup brush lying around (see image).
 

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You don't have to take all the paint off, just the paint that is peeling. Myself, I find a putty knife best for that type of work (on the wood, anyways). Wash after scraping. And after washing, go through it one more time with your putty knife.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, putty knife on the door makes sense to me.

Any ideas on what to use on the front face of a barn besides a putty knife?
 

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I don't see much peeling paint on the barn. Maybe pressure wash first, but I would still go through it with a putty-knife/scraper, if possible. Looks like it could use a coat of primer before painting. Those door tracks look pretty rusty --- best if you could take those down, sand/brush the rust and a couple of coats of Rustoleum.
 

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Interesting project. How do you intend to apply material to the upper reaches of the barn face? 24' extension ladder? Scaffolding? Scissor lift?

The method you choose would determine my approach to cleaning up the siding. It's not very practical to pressure wash rigorously when standing at the top of a 24' extension ladder. The angle you can spray, likelyhood of blowback causing you to loose balance, debris flying around, wet environment etc. make it no fun. Scaffolding or scissor lift and pressure washing would becime more of a formality. A quality 1A ladder with standoffs, is the minimum I'd want to use if pressure washing.

Old rusty hardware needs some tlc. Perhaps use that wire wheel and a rust encapsulater like Eastwood's if a black satin finish is ok.

Paint vs stain: hmm... Stain's going to be a lot thinner, might be a bit easier to apply but won't last as long. Your call but if the wood is really rough I'd paint. A barn like that might get redone once every 25 years and by using a decent primer with 100% latex acrylic topcoat (resist skimping here to save $50 - $100) you would have more paint left in 2045 than you have now.

Love to see an after picture either way.

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For the doors consider using a heat gun. Sometimes there are stubborn areas that are hard to sand and impossible to scrape without one. Large flat areas like stiles and rails can be sanded but recessed panels can be tricky so a heat gun can help there.

And you probably don't want to pressure wash them as that may accentuate the grain in an unsightly manner.

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Paint vs stain: hmm... Stain's going to be a lot thinner, might be a bit easier to apply but won't last as long. Your call but if the wood is really rough I'd paint. A barn like that might get redone once every 25 years and by using a decent primer with 100% latex acrylic topcoat (resist skimping here to save $50 - $100) you would have more paint left in 2045 than you have now.

Love to see an after picture either way.

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You dont think a solid stain will last as long as paint?? Yes, it will, and it wont peel, so it will be easier to redo. Its a barn. To paint it properly, would mean oil prime, backrolled, then AT LEAST one good topcoat, backrolled, and who knows how long that would last with t shape of the wood. OR, you can spray and backroll one good coat of waterborne solid color stain, and just spray one more quick coat coat on top. Come back in 15 years.
 

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You dont think a solid stain will last as long as paint?? Yes, it will, and it wont peel, so it will be easier to redo. Its a barn. To paint it properly, would mean oil prime, backrolled, then AT LEAST one good topcoat, backrolled, and who knows how long that would last with t shape of the wood. OR, you can spray and backroll one good coat of waterborne solid color stain, and just spray one more quick coat coat on top. Come back in 15 years.
Valid points. They were considered. But with proper application and no maintenance I hedge my bets that the primed and painted barn will be protected for longer than the solid stained one. Priming with with oil will take some work but re-sheathing a barn may jepordize it's existence.



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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks everyone.

Door tracks are rusty. Kind of afraid to take 'em down. Was going to brush/sand what I can and put 2 coats of rust paint.

Working with a putty knife seems like a pain. Luckily found a paint stripper laying around the old shop here (image attached).

To get to the top of the barn, I'll use an extension ladder.

Never used a rust encapsulator before, I'm guessing it'd be a little pricier but better than typical rust paint.

Now that I think of it, the barn was last painted about 25-30 years ago. The plywood seems quite thin and it's curling at some corners. Maybe it should be replaced? No funds for that, though. There's 2 sides to that barn that need work. Image attached of the other side.

I think there is a heat gun somewhere in the shop. I'll definitely give it a try on the door if I can find it. Never would have thought of that.

Also never thought of staining the barn. Just assumed I'd paint it. Which method is more cost effective?
 

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IMO a solid stain is more cost effective. True it won't last as long as a paint job done right but there is less prep involved when it comes time to recoat and the job can be done with one coat.
 

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Ya I think the solid stain will be less expensive per coat. Apart from using an extension ladder, how do you intend to apply the material?

A box or two of galvanized roofing nails(1 1/2" long) would go a long way towards tidying up curling corners on that sheething. You might spend a day doing some carpentry there but it'll be worth it.

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Discussion Starter #15
I think I'm going to go with the paint. Just want it to last as long as possible.

I'm going to have to put some more thought into this. I don't have a lot of painting experience. The previous coats put on decades ago were sprayed. I think the same sprayer is laying around somewhere, not sure if the compressor's hose can reach to the top of the barn. If I can't find a sprayer, is it too crazy to just use a brush for the primer and top coat? Would that method take way too long?

Also concerned about the weather as it'll be colder by mid next week and that may not be ideal for paint drying. Will definitely sand and paint the door tracks before then.

Taking what's left of the old paint off the sheathing, I guess I'll power wash the bottom half of the barn and use a paint stripper attached to a drill for the top half due to using an extension ladder. There is some scaffolding around but I don't think there's enough to go high up.

I'll be buying some galvanized nails tomorrow. All tips welcomed, thank you!
 

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You wouldn't want to use a conventional [air powered] spray gun - it's too slow! For spraying you need an airless. It's best to back roll sprayed paint to work it into the wood. You could brush/roll the barn if you don't wish or have the capability to spray.
 

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If I can't find a sprayer, is it too crazy to just use a brush for the primer and top coat?
The whole barn ? Yes, that would be crazy. You can cut in around the edges with a brush, but use a roller for as much as possible. Go to the hardware store and buy an aluminum painting pole for your roller. Maybe with the pole and the scaffolding, you could reach most of the way to the top.
 

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Yep, roll it. Invest in a good frame and sturdy long extension pole and paint as much as you can from the ground. I'd use a long lambswool cover and 12" paint tray because both will hold a ton of paint and the roller will fill nooks and crannies better than a shorter nap. Downside is it'll be heavier so that doesn't combine well with an extension pole while up on a ladder so be wise and if you need to change rollers.

Also, I wouldn't get too involved with removing the old paint with the disk. Consider scraping it with a 12" or 14" drywall knife then going over it with something rough like 40 grit sanding pad on your new extension pole.

Getting as much work done as possible from the ground will be your best bet to beat the weather and will save energy. Needless to say, it's also the safest. Good luck. Post pics.



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Discussion Starter #19
Grinding a door track now. Was hoping to finish the tracks and prime them before it rains tomorrow. Can't get to the bare metal with a wire brush. Pics attached.

I see some of the 3 layer plywood sheathing has a layer that's disintegrating. Still worth saving with paint?

Bah, I'm on the fence about this whole thing. The barn is currently not in use. The farm is retired. There's a 50/50 chance that we'll let the barn rot. The cost taking down 3 layers of shingles and putting new ones on is at least $10,000 per side.

There a tiny chance that we'd convert the 1,800 sq foot barn into a living space. But it'll depend on cost.
 

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I'd use a long lambswool cover and 12" paint tray because both will hold a ton of paint and the roller will fill nooks and crannies better than a shorter nap.
I'd also use a lambswool cover [3/4" or 1"] but I wouldn't fool around with a tray. It's quicker/easier to roll out of a 5 gallon bucket - using a roller screen/grid is optional.
 
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