DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got a bunch of different paint from interior & exterior projects. They are usually 1 gallon cans with a quart or 1/2 gallon of paint. What's the best way to store them to keep the paint fresh so I can use it in months / years? later to touch up things?

I've been putting them into the clear plastic round containers we might get for take out soup, etc. Trying to minimze the amount of air that's in the container - using different size containers depending on how much paint there is.

For 1 smaller amount of paint, I put it in a ziplock freezer bag and squeezed out the air. Went to use it today and it was pretty hard.

do zip locks usually work? the clear soup containters with snap on lids?

Something else?

Oh, have you ever heard of this? 2 year old paint can - enough paint that I left it in the can. The can had 2 rust holes through it?! Went to mix / shake it and saw the paint / liquid coming out! Never had that issue before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,914 Posts
Well, I dont do this, but they make a produce called Bloxygen, that is a gas, you can spray in the can before putting the lid on. Some people have suggested holding your breath and exhaling into the can before capping it. Glass jas will probably work the best if its a very small amount of paint. Or, you can buy empty quart and gallon cans from a paint store. pour your paint in a new can carefully, and dont get any on the lid, and it should be good to go for years if stored correctly. Some people suggest storing the cans upside down as well...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Ah! Glass jars! I've been using those for carpenter bee traps. But yeah, better than plastic soup containers!
 

·
Usually Confused
Joined
·
6,664 Posts
I'd vote for the smaller cans from a paint store. The less air in the can the better. The people we bought this place from left us heels of paint in plastic tubs - didn't last. The only can I've ever had rust through was a Zinsser's product but I can't remember which one.
 

·
JUSTA MEMBER
Joined
·
15,461 Posts
Years ago, I got access to many small glass jars, that originally held, toddler food.

Used many to hold less than a pint of old paint in them.

I do not know if Baby food still comes in glass jars, but I would guess that one could use clean pickle, jam, syrup, and the list goes on, jars / bottles.

That one that you had rust, must have gotten a lot of water dripping on it, over the last few years.

ED
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
602 Posts
Put the lid on tight, store the can upside down. If a thick film forms it will be on the bottom when you open the can.

The problem with putting the paint in another container ... you lose all the label information about brand, color, sheen etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,820 Posts
Smaller paint cans (available at big box stores) help. You can also put a layer of food wrap across the top before you seal up the can.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,872 Posts
As an admitted "hoarder of old paint" I simply keep them in the original containers. Keep them in a cool, dark place so sunlight and/or heat doesn't affect them. I have some cans of paint that are well over 20 years old. If I have a need to use paint that old, I simply pour it out through a strainer into another empty (clean) paint can, add a little Floetrol, mix well, and it's ready to go! It doesn't always work as some cans are more prone to rusty lids/lips and that can be problematic.

Also, if I do get a bunch of paint that I know I'll never use again, I pour the gallons into a five gallon bucket. Just be sure to mix similar sheens/colors so you don't end up with something funky. That mixed up leftover paint comes in handy if you're painting basement walls or some dingy shed or really any paint job where great paint is not needed to get the job done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Bloxygen being argon (I think) and gases such as CO2 from exhaling into a can only work with finishes which cure through oxidation which would include paints containing drying oils. They won’t work with WB acrylics, lacquers, and most waterborne finishes except for maybe hybrid emulsion paints.

I just use a couple of layers of stretch wrap stretched tightly around the lids where meeting the can to inhibit evaporation with waterborne paints which works great.


Edit:
Figured I’d add one benefit which Bloxygen & CO2 could provide when used in WB paint cans is displacing oxygen which would inhibit odor causing aerobes from growing in the cans or on top of the paint including mold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,293 Posts
Do NOT put the paint in a plastic container, as I once did. 😁 :rolleyes:

I put about a pint of oil-based paint in a large yogurt container. Sealed it nice and tight with duct tap too and set it on a shelf in the garage.

After about 6 months I went to use the paint and the container had warped and shriveled up. It was OK, but I think if I had waited another few months, the container would have exploded or melted, and made one heck of a mess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,820 Posts
OK, but you don't have to generalize that to "don't put any paint in any plastic container". :) Sherwin Williams was actually selling their (acrylic) paint in plastic containers for awhile. Obviously some plastics can handle oil based products just fine. I mean, paint solvents come in plastic containers, after all.
 

·
JUSTA MEMBER
Joined
·
15,461 Posts
And I use small plastic containers, Cottage cheese, sour cream, and similar, as temporary holders for small touch up jobs.

Then dispose of the container, and get another , next time.

ED
 

·
Usually Confused
Joined
·
6,664 Posts
The problem with putting the paint in another container ... you lose all the label information about brand, color, sheen etc.
I created an Excel table with info like colour name, code, base code, etc. Besides, my paint store keeps a record of everything they mix for their customers.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top