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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am working on a project and need to put many pieces of 2" pipe through a 4" pipe. Rather than spend $1400 on fittings, I've decided to get a 60mm hole saw and just drill holes in the 4" pipe.

Question is, what is the best way to make the seal leak-tight? I'm thinking PVC cement. The only other thing I can think of is silicone, but I don't think it would hold up as well over time.

Is PVC cement the right choice? Is there another option?
 

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Before I make assumptions, I take it you are planning on using PVC pipe for your project? Exactly how many of these unions are you going to have if you are estimating $1400 in fittings? Leak tight to what extent and under what pressure and flow rate?
 

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JOATMON
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What is the application?

Doesn't really matter.....if I think I understand what your proposing.....not going to work.

Yes...you can use primer...and then PVC cement to 'glue' those 2" tubes into your 4" header.....as long as you can insure that they will NOT move, and you don't use too much pressure, you 'should' be ok....but....I really doubt you can keep the tubes from moving...

For PVC to have a strong bond...it needs lots of surface area...you are not going to have lots of surface area...

Additionally, there are numerous issues connecting pipes/tubes to a larger round pipe (header).....if you want an idea of what is involved....look at the costruction of radiators.

Good luck...
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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What is the application?

Doesn't really matter.....if I think I understand what your proposing.....not going to work.

Yes...you can use primer...and then PVC cement to 'glue' those 2" tubes into your 4" header.....as long as you can insure that they will NOT move, and you don't use too much pressure, you 'should' be ok....but....I really doubt you can keep the tubes from moving...

For PVC to have a strong bond...it needs lots of surface area...you are not going to have lots of surface area...

Additionally, there are numerous issues connecting pipes/tubes to a larger round pipe (header).....if you want an idea of what is involved....look at the costruction of radiators.

Good luck...
Indeed your contact surface is going to be limited to the thickness of the 4" pipe as far as trying to glue it.

I was thinking you could use something like flexible rubber flashing like for roof vents to both stabilize and seal (so long as the 4" will not be under pressure) but I cannot imagine they will be any cheaper than PVC slip fittings?

Does your 2" material have to be the same as the 4"? What about 2" rubber and 4" pvc. If you could compress the rubber feeding it through the openings it would expand to grip the sides of the hole without any cement? Again, so long as you do not have pressure running through the 4".

And again, just to be sure? Does the 2" connect to the 4" or pass unbroken through it? I read your post as though you were passing it through but ddawg read it as you wanting to connect.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Before I make assumptions, I take it you are planning on using PVC pipe for your project? Exactly how many of these unions are you going to have if you are estimating $1400 in fittings? Leak tight to what extent and under what pressure and flow rate?
I need 96, and there about $15 a pop. They will be under almost no pressure.

I think im going to get the bit i need and do a test run with pvc cement, silicone, maybe even a 2 part epoxy like jb weld. Thought about maybe even using hot glue, no real experiance with it though.
 

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I would still search for rubber pipe flashing, rubber sleeves, rubber bushing, etc. that would lock in your drilled hole and grip the pipe passing through. Like in an automotive application where pipes and electrical pass through things, for example.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, the point is to join, but technically it will pass through - otherwise you'd need to have a curved end on the 2" pipe.

While it would be a ***** to do, fleece + fiberglass would be cheap and pretty-well guaranteed to work. You could wrap the 2" pipe in a 1" strip of fleece, force it 1/2 through the hole, then let the resin soak in the fleece. That's how I made the corners on my waterproof table - took 5 gallons of fiberglass and about 2 weeks to build, but it is incredibly waterproof.
 

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Well, the point is to join, but technically it will pass through - otherwise you'd need to have a curved end on the 2" pipe.

While it would be a ***** to do, fleece + fiberglass would be cheap and pretty-well guaranteed to work. You could wrap the 2" pipe in a 1" strip of fleece, force it 1/2 through the hole, then let the resin soak in the fleece. That's how I made the corners on my waterproof table - took 5 gallons of fiberglass and about 2 weeks to build, but it is incredibly waterproof.
I am confused. It would help to know what you are trying to build?
 

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Actually welding it might be your best bet if you can get PVC compatible rods. I should think so. I still worry about how much lateral stress your pass through pipe is going exert. Will it slide around?

Anyhow, I looked and even Harbor Freight has plastic welding kits for like $15. You might look for something with an adjustable heat source and pay a bit more though.

 

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Without the full info on what it is your really trying to do your just wasting every ones time here having to guess.
You have the benifit of picking the brains of some clever people that have been there done that for free, shame to not use there time wisely.
 

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If a patent hasn't been applied for, telling what it is would be foolish . :laughing: We just can't expect a percent of the revenue for our information.:mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Going to be used for an indoor garden:



If you put the plants directly through a hole in the pipe, they tend to overflow when the plants get larger and the roots start to create resistance. By raising the plants out of the water, even by only a few inches, the hope is that the main area runs faster and won't overflow at the brim.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yeah - I've only ever seen it done by drilling a hole, or using a fitting on super-price, small systems. If fittings were so crazy expensive, that would be that way to go, but 4" T's go from $10-15 -- makes sense if your adding a sink and just need one, but it's crazy if you need 96.

Going to do some serious R&D now that I have some options - kind of like the idea of plastic welding. I want to see just how tight the pipe goes in too - if it's snug going in, I might just need some pvc cement.
 
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