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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I have a 22x30 back garden that is virtually an empty shell at the moment. I'd like to put a tree or two back there, but don't want something that will get too large since it's so close to the house. Any recommendations on trees that will give a bit of shade without becoming overgrown and intrusive?
Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks DangerMouse. I'll have to look into fruit trees. I really hadn't thought about them at all. It would be nice to be able to actually eat some of the fruit as well!
My last home had a few young trees when we moved in and it took them about 6 years to offer any shade. I know larger trees are more expensive to buy though. Guess I'll have to price some different sizes out.
Thanks again.
 

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the Musigician
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Check local nurseries for dwarf trees, they fruit and grow fast, but not too tall.

DM
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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It would be nice to know where you are. I love dwarf fruit trees if you can commit to maintaining them. They are not going to give you much shade though. There are many, nice, standard size but small, low maintenance trees that would be better choices for that.

You should get your hands on books from the library listing trees suited to your climate. Most books categorize them by size and other characteristics. Your arborist may have a list of trees he/she would like to see planted for urban forest diversity, disease and insect resistance, etc.

Do you think you want evergreen or deciduous trees? If evergreen would you like conifers or broader leaf type evergreens?
 

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Where are you located? I prefer to plant native trees to the region with the exception of Japanese Maples (which I love). Down here in the south, Riverbirch trees are exceptional shade trees that are not invasive but just as their name suggests, they can handle soggy soil. They would not be suited to you if you live in the desert.
 

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You know, I had the same problem. Eventually I have decided to go with shrubs, but today I was thinking that I would look much more impressive with magnolia trees, I love them. I have found one site about different types of trees and there you have bonsai trees, magnolia trees, palm trees, almost every kind of trees. I am sorry I haven't found this site when I needed one, maybe it will help someone else :)
 

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Wow, nice site--lots of info----Mike---
 

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Suggestions

Hi
New to this site but here are my suggestions. Heptacodium is a great medium sized vase shaped tree with peeling bark. It has great fall interest as it blooms in fall-first creamy white turning a reddish color-Monarchs love this tree!! Witchhazels are also nice as they bloom yellow in the spring. If you need an evergreen, the only one I like are Hemlocks as their branches dance with the wind. Don't forget to layer with shrubs, perennials, ground covers. Hope this helps.
 

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Thread might be old---but adding new ideas is very helpful---Spring planting time is here for many members--------
 

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The key to using plants as integral parts of landscape designs for small spaces is to repeat just a few varieties. For instance, you can mix and match apple, pear and plum trees espaliered against your boundary walls then, following your choice of colors, pick just two or three varieties of plants and stick with those. Some shrubs resemble small trees, so check them out as well.
 
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