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I have spent about 4 hours researching what is the best solution for my situation here on our 60 year old ranch home in Phoenix, AZ and about the only thing I am sure of is that prep is probably the most important thing.

The project consists of a flat overhang running the length of the house which leads into a carport. The ceiling is tongue/groove. All the old wood is redwood. We are having some of the more badly damaged wood replaced (with redwood or doug fir). We also have demo'd a piss poor stucco job that covered up years of crap and our re-siding with board/batten (smooth 1/2 inch plywood). Some of the wood we are not replacing needs some TLC which we are going to do with Bondo.

I have looked at Benjamin Moore (bc we used it on the interior and were pleased) but I have seen great things about Sherman Williams Duration but just read a not so stellar review on that. I also just read a remark that lots of pro's here in the desert use Dunn Edwards. I since we have old wood I have toyed with using an oil based primer then latex over that but also read it's not necessary with newer latex paints.

It's as dry as it gets here so I don't have to contend with as much moisture/humidity. Just the brutal sun and the occasional dust storm. We are going to be applying it in July/August as well so READ HOT temps. For now it's just the north facing side so if we do early morning we should not have any direct sun on us, but temps are usually 90+ even at sunrise.

We toyed with spraying some of it too (at least the new siding) so I have been trying to factor that in as well.

I won't even begin with wether to use flat, satin or other right now. I just want to get my brand of paint down and application best suited for our multiple surfaces (old wood, bondo'd wood, virgin wood, and metal drip edge).

Any thoughts, advice and real world stories is much appreciated.
 

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It sounds like a brutal environment to say the least.

You are absolutely right about the prep work being the foundation to any success. Take the time and patience to do things right and you will not be revisiting this project anytime soon. Use only top of the line products -like Bondo patch, elastomeric polyurethane caulking, and Gripper primer.

The reviews on Consumer Reports have been very favorable on the BEHR ULTRA paint sold at Home Depot. Two coats of the Satin finish on siding and semi-gloss on trim will give the most protection for the longest period of time.

I have used BM's AURA & MOORE-GLO, SW's DURATION, and HD's BEHR ULTRA. I have been able to revisit all these homes years later and have been the most pleased with the ULTRA. Dunn Edwards paint I have not used. I think they are based and developed out of the UK (much different climate than AZ).

Pressure washing the finished product annually will prolong the life of the paint.

Hope this helped.
 

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jschaben
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Hi I live in central Kansas and, while not quite as brutal as you get, we have some rough times.. Right now into the 2nd week of 105-107*, I used Ben Moore Moorglo with Glidden Gripper primer, both sprayed, about 15-16 years ago. The majority still looks good. There are some window sills that should have been primed with a good oil base primer that need some attention this year. If the wood is old and has been exposed and dried out, you will need to do those areas with an oil base primer. An alternative would be 50-50 linseed oil and mineral spirits to restore some of the oils that have been dried out. Downside of the linseed oil/mineral spirits is it needs a good 4-6 weeks before priming and then would need an oil primer. I did need to repaint a fairly substantial area of one side last summer to cover some of my grandsons artwork, he got ahold of a can of automotive engine enamel but that's another thread, and I used Behr Ultra. It went on decent sprayed but hasn't been on long enough to testify to durability.
 

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NACE Coating Inspector
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It sounds like a brutal environment to say the least.

You are absolutely right about the prep work being the foundation to any success. Take the time and patience to do things right and you will not be revisiting this project anytime soon. Use only top of the line products -like Bondo patch, elastomeric polyurethane caulking, and Gripper primer.

The reviews on Consumer Reports have been very favorable on the BEHR ULTRA paint sold at Home Depot. Two coats of the Satin finish on siding and semi-gloss on trim will give the most protection for the longest period of time.

I have used BM's AURA & MOORE-GLO, SW's DURATION, and HD's BEHR ULTRA. I have been able to revisit all these homes years later and have been the most pleased with the ULTRA. Dunn Edwards paint I have not used. I think they are based and developed out of the UK (much different climate than AZ).

Pressure washing the finished product annually will prolong the life of the paint.

Hope this helped.
:whistling2:
 

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I have spent about 4 hours researching what is the best solution for my situation here on our 60 year old ranch home in Phoenix, AZ and about the only thing I am sure of is that prep is probably the most important thing.

The project consists of a flat overhang running the length of the house which leads into a carport. The ceiling is tongue/groove. All the old wood is redwood. We are having some of the more badly damaged wood replaced (with redwood or doug fir). We also have demo'd a piss poor stucco job that covered up years of crap and our re-siding with board/batten (smooth 1/2 inch plywood). Some of the wood we are not replacing needs some TLC which we are going to do with Bondo.

I have looked at Benjamin Moore (bc we used it on the interior and were pleased) but I have seen great things about Sherman Williams Duration but just read a not so stellar review on that. I also just read a remark that lots of pro's here in the desert use Dunn Edwards. I since we have old wood I have toyed with using an oil based primer then latex over that but also read it's not necessary with newer latex paints.

It's as dry as it gets here so I don't have to contend with as much moisture/humidity. Just the brutal sun and the occasional dust storm. We are going to be applying it in July/August as well so READ HOT temps. For now it's just the north facing side so if we do early morning we should not have any direct sun on us, but temps are usually 90+ even at sunrise.

We toyed with spraying some of it too (at least the new siding) so I have been trying to factor that in as well.

I won't even begin with wether to use flat, satin or other right now. I just want to get my brand of paint down and application best suited for our multiple surfaces (old wood, bondo'd wood, virgin wood, and metal drip edge).

Any thoughts, advice and real world stories is much appreciated.
Hi RiseAgainst and HDPaintPro,
This is Dave Hsia, Product Manager at Dunn-Edwards Paints. We came across your discussion here and wanted to add a correction. Dunn-Edwards was founded and is based in Los Angeles, CA. Our paints are manufactured in Phoenix, AZ and are formulated specifically to withstand the varied climates of the Southwest, from cool coastal environments to the warmest desert climates. We have 20 locations in Arizona to serve you. You may read more about us on our website: http://www.dunnedwards.com/PaintingContractors/AboutUs/WhyDunnEdwards/TheDunnEdwardsAdvantage.aspx. We would hope you will consider our brand when making your paint purchase decision. Thank you!
 

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NACE Coating Inspector
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Hi RiseAgainst and HDPaintPro,
This is Dave Hsia, Product Manager at Dunn-Edwards Paints. We came across your discussion here and wanted to add a correction. Dunn-Edwards was founded and is based in Los Angeles, CA. Our paints are manufactured in Phoenix, AZ and are formulated specifically to withstand the varied climates of the Southwest, from cool coastal environments to the warmest desert climates. We have 20 locations in Arizona to serve you. You may read more about us on our website: http://www.dunnedwards.com/PaintingContractors/AboutUs/WhyDunnEdwards/TheDunnEdwardsAdvantage.aspx. We would hope you will consider our brand when making your paint purchase decision. Thank you!
Hey Dave. Welcome to the site.
 

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Hi RiseAgainst and HDPaintPro,
This is Dave Hsia, Product Manager at Dunn-Edwards Paints. We came across your discussion here and wanted to add a correction. Dunn-Edwards was founded and is based in Los Angeles, CA. Our paints are manufactured in Phoenix, AZ and are formulated specifically to withstand the varied climates of the Southwest, from cool coastal environments to the warmest desert climates. We have 20 locations in Arizona to serve you. You may read more about us on our website: http://www.dunnedwards.com/PaintingContractors/AboutUs/WhyDunnEdwards/TheDunnEdwardsAdvantage.aspx. We would hope you will consider our brand when making your paint purchase decision. Thank you!
Someone just got schooled. DAYEM!
 

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My surface is EIFS/semi rough stucco in New Mexico. Dunn Edwards - too expensive. Plus i want to do this in one coat. Valspar - I just think it's too thin and I don't need a masonry-specific paint AND Lowes doesn't seem to be selling the 5 gallon anymore and that was just a turn off - like they don't expect people to use that much? Sherwin Williams - folks just aren't crazy about it anymore and it too is expensive plus the overpriced "HGTV" marketing ploy at Home Depot is just a turn off. They're trying to be everywhere and it seems desperate being as though we have TWO Sherwin Williams store in town. When you think a brand is high end and special and you see their stuff appearing at True Value and Home Depot, it no longer seems all that special. BEHR? I would probably be good with the Ultra but i'm trying to get as thick as possible without going to the elastomeric. The Behr Ultra was actually my second choice and the same price. Elastomeric would be totally unnecessary as a re-paint and way too expensive plus permeability is an issue with EIFS. I may end up using a gallon or two of elastomeric only up on the top of parapets (the side facing the sky) but we'll wait and see. It's a re-paint and there really is no need to take the expense, the added mess and time to prime. If i thought i needed all that, i'd probably hire someone. Painters always prime and by just what i've said is why. Priming=Professional it just is. Also I'm painting it the same color, therefore, I need something thick, UV protected and one that will fill in only a few minor cracks. It's an attached home so I have only 2 full sides to paint and a lifetime guarantee stated on the label just makes me feel better. I want to be able to do this with one 5 gallon bucket so the coverage can't be too low and not too thin either. Winner? PPG Timeless. Exterior. Flat. 5 gallon. $177 at Home Depot - all day long. Sanctuary or You Gotta Have it will be my color. Though I am very confident, I am still going to get a quart and test it. I'll be back with pictures and a follow up.
 
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