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Discussion Starter #1
We are in the middle of remodeling due to a flood. My wife would like to remove this wall to turn the dining room and kitchen in to one big room. Confirmed this morning that it is a bearing wall, the joists for the dining room and kitchen joists end on top of this wall. In the attic the support does not extend to the roof. The reason I'm asking is we are trying to determine what it would look like before we go any further. My wife mentioned that she would like to have a rough looking exposed beam. But I was thinking more along the lines we would need a laminated beam. If it didn't extend down too far we could wrap it to look like an exposed beam. Wall is 13ft wide.
 

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No-one here can be sure of the size; you would need to have that spec'ed. You can use a engineered product such as LVL and wrap it with reclaimed wood to give the appearance of an antique beam. Depending on what's above you may be able to move the entire beam up into the area above and then put in a non-structural faux beam or leave the ceiling flat.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I agree and understand what your saying. Just would like an idea of what it would look like before we go that expense of hiring an engineer. Once we decide it's coming out (my wife already has lol) we will do what's necessary. Just would like to vision how far it will come down. I imagine we will have to add another fake beam to balance the room out. Just an idea of what I would need would be acceptable at this point.
 

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My initial building plans had a triple 143" x 9-1/4 x 1-3/4 LVL spec'd which an engineer stamped. This was with a floor load above.

For ceiling joists, and attic only, this may be enough. Of course, you need to consult an engineer of course. The worst would be they spec 11-1/4" high.

I changed my mind and replaced the 9-1/4 LVL's with a 6" high I beam. I was able to span 162" with that.
This you could bury in the attic and hang the joists off it.

Now you just need to figure out the post going down to the slab and if you're able to dig the footings for them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is what I have in the garage. I am an hvac guy not a builder. If I had to have a beam extend down this far I don't think I would want to remove the wall. Just would not look good which is another reason why I was asking. Appreciate the feedback. Span in attic is 10' wide so I think the beam above is out.

Place is a mess right now is we have everything moved out of our living area
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Garage length is roughly 20'. After cabinets are removed I can get access to both walls. There are 2 2x12's on each wall below the house and the are supported by a chain wall around the perimeter of the house. There is also cinder blocks on a foundation below the interior wall. I don't think it would be an issue blocking it up inside both walls. There is an upstairs bedroom wall that is perpendicular to the existing wall that won't allow me access to one side to have an attic beam
 

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As mentioned, you must find out if there is a footing under the inside corner of the wall and if no, you have to think about the value of digging up a new footing. Anything existing underneath probably wasn't built to hold up new loads. I am assuming the outside wall has a full foundation as well as footing that is rated for the new load. I'm in NJ and I always worked with older houses which usually has 12x24" footings. No town inspector wanted verification no matter what I wanted to do, so I guessed the footing loads were assumed, but your case may be different.

Opening living is always better, I think, but you also need to check if the open space will change heat needs. That should be easy for you.

Don't know about box stores and if the lvl/lumber companies still do this, but when I bought lvl from the lumber yard, the brand factory had engineers who would do the specs for you. I described/drew the plan exactly and faxed it to the factory who returned with the sizes needed. The town inspector accepted it. It was free.
If the window wall is the eave and the roof rafters rest on it, you may have to cut the beam end to fit, and include that in your plan for the engineers. Some may be allowed but I don't know if and how much. Adding studs into the 2x4 wall would give you the needed surface area and you have to add more blocks in the joist bays under the post, tight to the foundation sill plate. The floor underlayment is accepted so you don't have to cut it for the post. If you use 2x10, eg, you can bury the half in the attic and half in the living space, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Appreciate the feed back guys! It's helping my a lot. My footings are overkill when I put them in so I th no I'm good there. Looks
Like we are going to open it up. Anything else anyone wants to add please do
 

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This is from the Ontario building code.

It can give you an idea.

My span is 13'. You can see I highlighted it (4.2m). My beam is dead center of the house, equal loading both sides.
1/2 of the 13' joist span and half of the other 13' joist span equaled 13' of course.
4.2 m is 13-9" so I chose the first one which could span 4.8m (15-3/4') as 13-1/2' was my longest dimensions between columns.
W150x22

Double check anything you do with an engineer.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It's all Greek to me lol. No and right now it would be almost impossible to approach them. 200,000 homes flooded in this area. It's a nightmare in there. There's a permit on almost every door. Good part is they are not charging for any permits. But the lines at the office are hours long still. Can't access anything on line that I'm aware off. Just not my field so I would not know where to start. I have a really good customer that is an architect. I'm going to approach him and see if he can point me in the right direction
 
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