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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm trying to figure out the best option for building my deck. Since its a cantilever/bay I am planning on a free-standing deck. If you look at my deck-layout jpg you can see what the lowes deck design suggested i am skeptical. As you can see, it shows the beams nearest the house in some places being supported by one post. Is this even possible according to code? If not, what would you guys recommend?. One option I was thinking of was using two beams and doubling the joist at the one the sides of the bay where the windows are. This way I could potentially cantilever the joist further. Some details of my deck are that its going to be 18' wide by 16' deep. The height will be approx 30". Also, the distance from the door of the bay to the wall is 3', too long to cantilever without using 2x12" joist, which is out of the question.

Thanks and sorry if I'm forgetting any pertinent info.
 

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Civil Engineer
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Not sure where you are located, or if there is a building code in your area. If there is, and you need a permit, I suggest you start by discussing the project with your local building inspector, they will probably be happy to discuss the rules and regulations that apply in your area. If you don't need a permit, or there are no building codes in your area, you may want to consider reading and following the Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide, available here at no charge http://www.awc.org/codes-standards/publications/dca6.

This is a very good publication, includes diagrams and discussion about how to construct all aspects of a deck, including beams, joists, posts, railings, stairs, foundation, and the connections between the pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not sure where you are located, or if there is a building code in your area. If there is, and you need a permit, I suggest you start by discussing the project with your local building inspector, they will probably be happy to discuss the rules and regulations that apply in your area. If you don't need a permit, or there are no building codes in your area, you may want to consider reading and following the Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide, available here at no charge http://www.awc.org/codes-standards/publications/dca6.

This is a very good publication, includes diagrams and discussion about how to construct all aspects of a deck, including beams, joists, posts, railings, stairs, foundation, and the connections between the pieces.
I have read it, however, there is not much that pertains to my unique situation. I will require a permit but have never done one. I have never spoken with any inspectors but I guess it cannot hurt to try. I was just hoping for some feedback online first.
 

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Just go down to the building department and ask. Many that I've dealt with had an information packet walking you through the steps needed to obtain the permit. Some even had brochure on info that specifically pertaining to decks.

If you actually want to 'talk to an inspector', I've found that showing up right when the office opens is your best chance as their usually still in the office and haven't left for the field yet. That's been my experience anyway.
 

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Welcome to the forums!

In that Deck link, it shows the possible requirement of shear hardware connecting the deck to the house. Also the posts within 5' of house need to as deep as house footings, but you read that. Also the windows ; the one window near the sliding door (operable panel) is probably safety glazed- check in glazing at lower right-hand corner. The other two windows will also need to comply, if not already... just add a post- silly drawing- .

Gary
 
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