DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

Getting to the next stage of my bathroom reno and its beadboard wainscoting. I am buying the 4 x 8 beadboard sheet and will cut to 38" with a 7" baseboard trim and a 2 or 3" top trim. Need some advice on the best way to keep everything on the walls.

Studs are on 24" centers.

Should I:

Mark the stud locations, nail into them when I can and glue the rest to the gyproc?

OR

Cut out a horizontal 4" or so wide strip along the walls of gyproc and replace with 1/2" plywood for a nailing surface. 2 strips maybe? More work but I want to be safe.

Let me know if gluing and using the studs is enough or if there are better ways.

Cheers
 

·
Super moderator
Joined
·
1,879 Posts
in my world; gluing and nailing into the studs is enough

also, I would go a step further and paint the panels with
the same door and trim paint for additional moisture protection.

,
 

·
Super moderator
Joined
·
1,879 Posts
I personally like most of the PL (Pro-Line) adhesives.
just keep in mind that once you use any kind of adhesive
on drywall - removing the item glued down will most often result
in replacing the drywall. (or at least a major repair).
assuming you are going to put some kind of band on the top
of the beadboard will give you extra holding power.
caulking the joining seams before paint will give that professional look.
also caulking the top of the baseboard will prevent moisture
from leaking down between the beadboard and baseboard.
I don't know how big your bathroom is, but, why do you want 7" baseboard ??
I try to keep everything in ratio perspective according to the room size.

adhesives is another hot topic in most craftsman's forums.

.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I made some 48" tall half walls for my corner shower. So my beadboard will be a total of about 48". Because it's higher than maybe a standard bearboard, I was beefing up the top rails and base. Maybe I will play around the with the two. maybe 4" top and 6" bottom?
 

·
Usually Confused
Joined
·
8,071 Posts
I would also paint the back - even just a coat of primer - to further protect the board from absorbing moisture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
732 Posts
I use adhesive and panel nails. I put the panel nails in bead groove typically so they aren't visible once painted. Us a regular screw driver or punch to sink them a bit. I'm typically not concerned about hitting a stud because the panel nail grips the drywall enough to hold the panel in place until the glue cures. The glue does all the holding after that. On panels and walls that are a warped, I just prop wood against the panel and use another piece of wood to brace against an opposing wall.

You could also use quick setting epoxy in a few places along with regular adhesive. The epoxy will cure quick holding it in place so the adhesive can cure.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top