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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I don’t know anything so I never looked under my hood.

my car didn’t start because my battery’s dead. if I had looked under the hood I would’ve known that that corrosion is not a good thing and I would’ve had my battery checked.

now I’m waiting on a tow truck who’s gonna charge it for me so I can get up to the repair shop and get a new battery :sad:






Just look at my records. This battery is 7 yrs old.
 

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Actually the battery may not be dead, but they will sell you a new one. That corrosion can build up between the battery clamp and the terminal. One difference between a dead battery and a bad connection is a bad connection you get no response. A dead battery often goes through a dying process where it gets worse over time or cranks for a little while and then stops, that's your warning.

If the battery is older never really hurts to get a new one but I look for 5 or more years and that is here in cold cranking country.

if you are not an "under the hood" person then you should be looking for a garage you can trust, getting harder and harder to find.

Good luck,
Bud
 

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More details?
What make vehicle?
How old is the vehicle and battery?
What were the symptoms?
What are they telling you? and are they the garage or truck driver?

Bud
 
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That's very possibly a good thing because, as Bud pointed out, a lot of corrosion there, so it could be out as simple as some past due maintenance, like removing and cleaning the terminals and posts. That is more than enough to prevent even an otherwise good battery from accepting adequate power from the charging system. And given the state of that I would also have a trusted technician check the belts, hoses, etc.
 

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Good for you! And yes, I mean that. I'm all for driving them for as long as they are safe and dependable. Unfortunately, being in the upper midwest, salt, and the subsequent corrosion attacks just about everything, so my average has been right about 10 years. Also unfortunate though is time, which can take its' toll on hoses, belts, tires, etc., so they still need to be maintained periodically, regardless of mileage, rust, or general wear and tear. But you know that I'm sure. In regard to your battery, assuming what you were saying is that it is good, as I mentioned, the terminals and posts need to be removed and cleaned, that's rather obvious, and I would also ask your technician to spray them with the red protectant. I can't think of the name for it right now, they will know what it is, but I keep a can of it in the shop and believe in it. You might also ask them about the felts that go over the posts, under the terminals. Batteries off gas, which can lead to corrosion, and those felts are supposed to prevent the gas from going directly to the connections.
 

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7 years is a long time in a hot climate. Under hood temperatures in FL are battery killers. My brother was in the auto parts business in NY and then FL. Lots more battery sales in FL. I thought NY cold was hard on batteries, but FL heat is deadly to them.
 
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" I had to climb up two steps to get in" LOL, my store front was located in the center of Bangor with a one way rotary in the middle part of town. I looked out front and here comes a monster big rig having trouble getting around the corner. He stopped in front trying to figure out how to get his monster into the Post Office down the road, too big to make the final turn. So I CLIMBED in and took him way around so he would have a straight shot into their driveway. When there I went to jump out, forgetting I needed to turn around and clime down and almost killed myself. He commented, gotta watch that first step and we laughed.

You see them on the road but never realize just how big they are.

Bud
 
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Did that include the tow?

Roughly $90-150 depending on the battery, $130 for an alternator and $20 for cable ends (if you really needed them) $250+ for what amounts to probably a half hour of actual labor to swap the parts, pretty good racket and the reason we DIY.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
No, the tow was $55 for about 6 miles.

You’d think in this day an age your car could give you a heads up when things are dying and not leave a gal stranded in her garage.

Funny, my last battery died at exactly the same time. Went to garage that morning and car wouldn’t start.

Told them they’re lucky I can pay it. Im trying to lower limit on my credit card but decided to leave $500 available for emergency.
 

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RESETTING itself ? Sounds like BS to me.
Was it vibrating before? If not then the tow truck or garage did something.
Do you feel the vibration in the steering wheel or just the car is vibrating?

How was the car returned to you, they drove it there I assume. Then the person who drove it should be aware of the vibration.

Ask to talk to the owner or manager.

Keep notes as to what was said. Keep your receipt listing what was done.

Walk around it to see if you have a low or flat tire.

Bud
 
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