DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was 1/2 inch off on my measuring and the tub does not fit the space provided. Is it okay to shave your studs down so that I can slide this tub in? If this is a dumb question---laugh your head off before you answer, okay? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Rick. After having a leaky bathtub for 12 years and not enough know-how, money or time to fix it, I finally had enough. Your help is appreciated. The best way to shave down the studs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Well, it really depends on the tools you have at your disposal. The easiest way would be to rip it most of the way with a skill saw and finish it off with a saws all. Try to hang on to all your fingers and toes :).

If room does not allow for ripping the studs, you can also try doing a series of close together horizontal cuts into the stud, then break them off with a pair of channel locks or hammer. It doesn't have to pretty, just functional.

Rick
http://myhandyadvice.blogspot.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
TY again! The Saws all is a magical tool! The tub slides right in. It is actually completely level on the stringers! Whoo hoo! Now, my issue is a mortar bed. I am supposed to "drop" the tub onto the mortar but there is no clearance room to drop it, I can only "slide" it in which will result in the mortar being pushed to the back wall. I do believe this tub needs one because there are no feet underneath---the belly just hangs in the air--about 2 inches of clearance to the floor. It is a very sturdy tub though, not a thin cheap one, so maybe it doesn't need one? Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Even though the tub is thick you really want something under it, or over time it very well may crack. This may require you to shave the studs on the rear end wall up to around 40". After that you should be able to insert the drain side of the tub, then lower the back end into place. That will give you the wiggle room you need for the mortar bed. Good luck.

Rick
http://myhandyadvice.blogspot.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's an American Standard Rope Twist tub, 60 x 32, acrylic. The directions just tell you to make a mortar bed, nothing specific. I can raise the drain side about 7 inches before the end piece stops itself on the wall (but this is only in one spot--when it is almost in place). Why don't they make a pumping mortar-thing like they have for foam insulation like they do around windows? Too thick? Anyhow, what about this plan: maybe I can dump a pile of mortar on a piece of plastic that runs up the back wall too. Then after sliding the tub in, I can raise it up on the drain end and pull the plastic sheet back into place (if it moved) and add a little more on top and then lower the tub? Never using mortar before, I have no idea. What do you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK, I heard the crickets loud and clear after my last reply. Went and brought back acrylic tub and bought steel one that does not need mortar bed. Thank you for your helpful suggestions sharpsport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,227 Posts
Steel is probably a better bet for your situation. A mortar bed would be a litle tricky there. I have only installed one tub in my life to date and that was a cast iron. 300+ LBS. My son and me wheeled it on a dolly cart as far as we could then wrestled it into the alcove. The cast irons have four stubby little feet that require leveling with metal shims. It is almost always a tight space to maneuver a bathtub. best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Jim F! This tub only weighed 100 lbs....only. Me and Motrin have a date tonight. ha! Your tub would have me in traction, or else I would be taking baths outside where the delivery guy left it.... :) Have a good night Jim!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top