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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are renovating our bathroom and are having a difficult time with tile placement in regard to direction. Attaching a picture of the bathroom for visual orientation.


The question is what direction to put our tiles on the floor and on the walls. We are planning on using gray colored tiles with similar colored grout from floor to ceiling.


Here are the thoughts we have- we have 12x24 sized tiles and all will be the exact same color and grout color. Bathroom is roughly 10ft from window to window(width) and 11ft from door to door(length)


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1) tiles on floor are perpendicular to cabinet and tub and then and vertical on the walls to match the direction of the floor. Problem is that the back wall of the shower will not match the floor due to orientation. I also understand that this may make the floors look wider, but the walls taller and maybe make the entire bathroom look smaller

2) Tiles on floor are parallel to cabinets and horizontal (ie parallel to tub on walls). The floors will match the wall to the right but will be perpendicular to the ones on the back wall of the shower...maybe a tall effect from the floor and wide effect from the walls

3) tiles on floor perpendicular to cabinets and walls parallel to the tub. I presume that this would provide an all up wider bathroom look .


We are basically ripping out the tub and creating a walk in shower/ dry area with a bench, installing stone tile in the niches (you cant see them, but to the right where the mirror is and near where I am standing to my left (above the tub)...I want to make the bathroom look bigger but also want something that will be appreciated by buyers at the time of when we sell the house (Which isnt any time soon). Any advise, thoughts, opinions would be greatly appreciated~!!!
 

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but also want something that will be appreciated by buyers at the time of when we sell the house
If you want a more timeless look, be very careful with trendy finishes, for example when you see brass & beige you scream 90's, river rock/glass tile 00's-10's, now greys in the late 10's.

I can't fully understand your questions without pics. Here's a great example of tile layout and joints by @tdisss, very impressive for a DIY
https://www.diychatroom.com/f49/remodeling-project-bathrooms-667553/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
not sure why It flipped the picture. Hopefully it gives a better visual. The tile we are using is 12x24 light gray tile. It is, for the most part, a single color and the grout will be the same color also to give a more of a backdrop on a painting look. The niches/mirror are going to have a grayish/brown stone tile. The paint will be a lighter gray color. The cabinets will be similar in color. The vanity..i am thinking will be closer to a white with hints of gray in it, but subtle.

On the shower floor, the mosaic tile will be a white with gray marbling. We are going for a very clean look with not much, if any, busyness. Hopefully this gives some additional context. Thank you!
 

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IMO I would probably run the tile in stack bond parallel with the tub, so you have a long linear perspective. Match the joints on horizontal stack bond wall tile. You have some "busyness" forced on you with the shower tile stopping with a high ceiling and the extra wall bumpout next to the vanity, so to make the tile more of a "backdrop" keep joints aligned and sizes as full as possible (i.e. no thin pieces like what is next to tub or on the tub panel). With large tiles sometimes tiling a whole wall creates a backdrop.
 

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Easier to have the long dimension of the tiles parallel to the long wall. I found tile that was available in a semi-smooth and a gloss finish and used the semi-smooth for the floor for less slipping and the gloss finish for the walls. Often tile will have a stated slip-resistance rating as a guide. An A or B tile will be safer on the floor than a C rated tile.
 
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