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I've replaced my old bathroom ceiling/light exhaust fan because in the cold winter climate the moisture from the shower would collect in the duct, condensate, and then when the weather would warm up a little, drip back into the bathroom (sometimes pouring out). The new fan is much stronger, but alas, I have the same problem occuring (although less frequently this past winter). The duct travels a long distance across my attic to the south facing wall...(it's the only option, as the roof is steeply pitched. Some have said to disconnect the duct and let it vent directly into the attic, but that doesn't seem smart if there is that much moisture going up there, wouldn't it just collect all over the insulation up there? Any suggestions about what I can do to fix this problem would be helpful.
 

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Venting into the attic is not a good idea. Look at the top of this page and you will see a link for "HVAC". Those guys would be more familiar with your topic.
 

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As Chris is hinting, you need to use insulated duct since you're having problems with condensation. It will probably help. The warm air in the duct reacting with the cold attic air just means lots of condensation.

The strongest bath fan isn't strong enough to "blow" the vent clear of moisture. They're strong enough to move a little air by creating a little static pressure in the duct, but not much more.

Be sure that your vent isn't too long, because it will reduce or eliminate the fan's effectiveness. They can only generate a certain amount of static pressure, and that pressure is greatly lessened in long runs of vent. There are almost always alternative locations to run it to.

Never ever vent it into the attic space. Your concerns about that are justified.
 
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