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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bath vent that only goes to the soffit and not out. Obviously this is not a desired condition so I would like to fix it. I am looking for some advice based on my situation. These are my three options as I see it...

1. I could terminate the vent through the soffit, but there are already vents on either side of where my bath vent exhaust would go. My concern is having the warm moist air being drawn back into the attic space.

2. I could vent out the side of my house ~6' away. My concern with this options is the warm moist air being "trapped" based on the design of my roof lines.

3. I could vent out the roof. My concerns with this is adding another roof penetration/potential leak point. I'm not should be concerned with snow? I live in mid-Michigan so we do get snow.

I consider myself to be handy and option 1 and 2 I would do myself. If I go with option 3 I will hire it out. The older I get the more apprehensive I am about getting on a 2nd story roof with a decent pitch. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

First pic show's the bathroom window and existing soffit vents. Pic two is where I would go out the side of the house in option 2.
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Roof is the only good option I see - while I like going out gable ends, that really isn't one & you are asking for more trouble there than through the roof
 

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IMHO (i.e. not an expert) I'd think option 1 would be fine. If you orient the vent so the angle of the louvers are pointing away from the house, the forced airflow of a powered exhaust fan (particularly one of the higher CFM models) should push the air past the eaves where the warm steamy air would then naturally rise up and away. Like you, I'd really want to avoid another roof penetration if at all possible.
 

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In your case I would go with 1 for less problems.
There is never going to be enough suction with the other vents to cause a problem.
What do you think happens now when it is a rain day. Just as much moisture in the air to suck in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are there rules prohibiting a bath vent from exhausting within 3’ of a window? If I go with option 1 I certainly will be within 3’.
 

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Are there rules prohibiting a bath vent from exhausting within 3’ of a window? If I go with option 1 I certainly will be within 3’.
No one is going to be able to definitively answer this for you due to code variances (often significant) between different localities. You really need to contact whomever oversees building permits/inspections/enforcement at your local level. If you have trouble getting a response out of them and you used a home inspector during the purchase of your home and they've been in your area a long time and should know what they're talking about, you could always ask them. Realistically, whether or not it's allowed by code will likely only ever (maybe) become an issue when you go to sell the house and the buyer gets it inspected.
 
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