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Hello all

My home was built in 1967. The foundation seems to have been poured a little too deep. For the most part I only have about 3 inches of the foundation sitting above grade. That being said, my basement has 3 glass block windows on the back of the house. One of these windows is directly under where the kitchen cantilevers out of the house about 2 feet. This completely covers the window making it pretty useless. We need to replace the glass blocks in the other four basement windows but I was wondering if it is even worth replacing this one.

How difficult would it be to just fill the hole with concrete? It is a standard sized opening. Would I need to drill in the sides/top/bottom and install any rebar then make some sort of form that would hold the concrete? How would I waterproof the patch? Could I use the dimple mat on the outside and just fill up the window well with soil? I will have to excavate the soil around the window well under the cantilever to even gain access to the window to potentially setup a form to fill the opening with concrete.

Sorry for the long post but in order to get some good responses I needed to paint a good picture. I can include some actual picture if it helps.

Thanks
 

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Concrete would be tough if not impossible to do right. Concrete blocks would work well if you took your time. Stucco the blocks on the outside to match the poured concrete.

I did a coal chute opening this way and added a rock veneer to match the old stone foundation. I really admire the work the old masons did to make the raised mortar joints. A major PITA.
 

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I am assuming a solid concrete block and mortar. Cut them down as needed and stagger the joints going up? From a weight perspective, do you think I could do the whole window at once or would I need to let the bottom couple of courses set first? Also, how would I compensate for a difference in thickness of the foundation wall and the block? I am by no means a mason. This would really be my first time using blocks and mortar. Again, I ask a lot of questions and appreciate the feedback.
 

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Just curious, how big is this window? Can you post a picture?
 

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raised mortar jnts are called grapevine last i knew,,, doubtful 1 can even find a pointing tool for them these days,,, we make our own
 

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I am assuming a solid concrete block and mortar. Cut them down as needed and stagger the joints going up? From a weight perspective, do you think I could do the whole window at once or would I need to let the bottom couple of courses set first? Also, how would I compensate for a difference in thickness of the foundation wall and the block? I am by no means a mason. This would really be my first time using blocks and mortar. Again, I ask a lot of questions and appreciate the feedback.
Foundations are usually 8 inches wide as are the cmu's.
 

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32x18. The one with the dryer vent blocking the view is the one I want to replace. The other is what it should look like.
You should be able to lay them all in one day. Three courses high is nothing if you get your mortar the right consistency and nice and sticky. For something like this solids or hollows are fine. Blocks can be purchased in 2, 4, and 8" heights. Width is much easier to cut down accurately than height.
 
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raised mortar jnts are called grapevine last i knew,,, doubtful 1 can even find a pointing tool for them these days,,, we make our own

The closest image, and not that close, I can find online is calling them raised ribbon joints. I will see if I have a picture. There is a nice pro reconstruction of one downtown maybe I can snap a pic of it.

Previously when attempting a repair I cut the profile into a spare drywall trowel but that did not work very well. This last time I just over filled the joint, let it set for a bit and carved out what I wanted with a pointer's trowel. Slow time consuming work.
 
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