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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We’d like to remove a section of a basement wall that is under the I beam. This is to remove closets and insert a dry bar. The section to be removed is between supports made up of 3 studs nailed together at each end of the 8’ section. My question is, can this be done safely or do I need to replace the 2x4 posts with metal Jack posts?

This is the closet wall in question. I’ve already removed the door and trim. I confirmed the 6x10 I-beam runs on top of this wall. The left side of this wall is the closet from the room behind. The 2 small closets combine to make the 8‘ wall.

Furniture Building Shelving Wood Flooring


Here is the cutout showing the 2x4 post. Stud finder indicates the same post config on the right end of the wall 18” right side of door opening.

Wood Rectangle Gas Flooring Hardwood


Any advice would be appreciated.
Rick
 

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retired framer
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How do you know there is a beam there?
Pulling the ceiling in the closet would give you a better view of it.
 

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We build the house before the basement slab goes in so it is usually simple to see which walls are bearing but in some places the slab is poored with the load points built in and everything is harder to figure out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the reply. There is exposed ceiling in an unfinished part of the basement that is inline with the closet wall plus I used an endoscope in the ceiling just behind the wall and I could see ~2” of the bottom of the beam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Won't know until you reveal more but it sounds initially like some or all of that structure will need to be maintained in some manner.
Both ends of that 8’ wall will be left in place which are the 3x 2x4 stud posts. My assumption, which may be wrong, is that the posts on the ends do the supporting and the studs between just frame the wall.
 

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Both ends of that 8’ wall will be left in place which are the 3x 2x4 stud posts. My assumption, which may be wrong, is that the posts on the ends do the supporting and the studs between just frame the wall.
That would be pretty safe if they were going to build a bearing wall the beam would stop at each corner. They would have saved the money on that piece of beam.
 

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You'll need to fully expose the beam across the top of the wall to be sure that it extends all the way across the top of the wall and that it's a continuous piece (no joints) through that length.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The number of studs in the corner may or may not mean anything.
View attachment 674279 View attachment 674280
The number of studs in the corner may or may not mean anything.
View attachment 674279 View attachment 674280
Should I remove all the drywall to expose the studs floor to ceiling? The distance from that left end to the nearest wall, (load bearing) is 14’. That’s why I’m thinking the 3 studs are the support post. I initially thought there would be a steel post in that corner it turned out to be just the stud wall.
 

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Should I remove all the drywall to expose the studs floor to ceiling? The distance from that left end to the nearest wall, (load bearing) is 14’. That’s why I’m thinking the 3 studs are the support post. I initially thought there would be a steel post in that corner it turned out to be just the stud wall.
You can strip it down, the question will be, are the corners important and is the beam above the wall.
If it is a one piece beam, the corners could still be load bearing so at that point you would need an engineer to till you what is going on.
 

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If I do that and it is a single beam, then would I be safe to remove the wall?
As Neal alluded to, you probably won't be able to remove the corners, since they function as posts. A 2x4 stud can carry thousands of pounds of vertical load, so just because there aren't steel posts in the corners, doesn't mean they're not a necessary part of the structural support system. If you find sheathing (plywood or OSB) panels attached to the corner studs, those are likely necessary bracing for the studs, so don't remove that without consulting a structural engineer.

Not knowing what's above the wall, I can't say for sure that you can remove the wall between the corner posts, but unless there's something unusual (e.g. a wall or column supporting the roof), it's likely the intermediate portion of the wall can be removed.
 

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As Neal alluded to, you probably won't be able to remove the corners, since they function as posts. A 2x4 stud can carry thousands of pounds of vertical load, so just because there aren't steel posts in the corners, doesn't mean they're not a necessary part of the structural support system. If you find sheathing (plywood or OSB) panels attached to the corner studs, those are likely necessary bracing for the studs, so don't remove that without consulting a structural engineer.

Not knowing what's above the wall, I can't say for sure that you can remove the wall between the corner posts, but unless there's something unusual (e.g. a wall or column supporting the roof), it's likely the intermediate portion of the wall can be removed.
If the wall is bearing there will be a header over the door.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
wouldn't be standard here, if a header is not needed you don't install one.
I’ll confirm later today if there’s a header or not above the door. FYI, my plan all along was to leave the two corners intact and just remove the door and studs between them.
I’ll post a new pic once I remove drywall.
 

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We’d like to remove a section of a basement wall that is under the I beam. This is to remove closets and insert a dry bar. The section to be removed is between supports made up of 3 studs nailed together at each end of the 8’ section. My question is, can this be done safely or do I need to replace the 2x4 posts with metal Jack posts?

This is the closet wall in question. I’ve already removed the door and trim. I confirmed the 6x10 I-beam runs on top of this wall. The left side of this wall is the closet from the room behind. The 2 small closets combine to make the 8‘ wall.

View attachment 674270

Here is the cutout showing the 2x4 post. Stud finder indicates the same post config on the right end of the wall 18” right side of door opening.

View attachment 674271

Any advice would be appreciated.
Rick
I’ll confirm later today if there’s a header or not above the door. FYI, my plan all along was to leave the two corners intact and just remove the door and studs between them.
I’ll post a new pic once I remove drywall.
doesnt look like load bearing walls...load bearing walls usally run down the center
if truss nothing load bearing
 
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