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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Greetings! This is my first post here. :)

I'm looking to add a subpanel as part of my finished basement project. I've purchased an Eaton BR1224L125V1 to serve as the subpanel. I'm planning on putting a 60-amp double pole breaker in my main panel to connect the subpanel. My questions are:

1. Is is sufficient to use one #6-3 wire for the connected between the main and subpanel.

2. The subpanel sits directly to the right of my main panel. What is the preferred way to protect the cable? EMT? If EMT, what are the correct parts to connect the conduit to each knock-out? And, related to this... do I have to use a particular knock-out or am I free to use the side knock-outs so the two panels have a very short run of conduit between them?

Thank you for any info you can provide. If you have any additional points to add, please do!

Here is a photo of the area:

 

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It is a subpanel, so you would need a ground wire as well as the (3) #6 Cu you are planning. The grounds and the neutrals are separated in the subpanel. You can certainly connect the subpanel to the main panel using conduit, I would check with the wiring inspector first to see what type of conduit, if any, they require.
 

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Use a rigid nipple between the panels. 1 1/4" and 4" long will work. Line up the side prefabricated ko's. Use THHN single conductor copper. Get locknuts, you'll need 4. 2 insulated grounding bushings. Get #10 THHN for grounding.
 

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Omission on my part... I was referring to #6 wire with the ground included.
That's cable, not wire
A cable is a bundle of wires together in a sheath
A wire is a wire...

For conduit you want individual THHN wires

I'll be doing something like this soon so I'll be interested in this thread
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Use a rigid nipple between the panels. 1 1/4" and 4" long will work. Line up the side prefabricated ko's. Use THHN single conductor copper. Get locknuts, you'll need 4. 2 insulated grounding bushings. Get #10 THHN for grounding.
This might be a silly question, but can I buy #6-3 cable and pull of the jacket so I can run the 3 wires loose inside the conduit? I think it's cheaper than buying per foot of individual wires. Also, is there any harm running the ground wire that comes bundled in the #6-3 w/ground cable? Trying to understand the recommendation to go with #10 for ground.

Thanks for the reply! I will go with the 4" rigid nipple.

I'll be doing something like this soon so I'll be interested in this thread
I'll keep the post updated as I go along... hope to get it done soon. :)
 

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6/3 nm is $1.73/ft
Three #6's THHN and a #10 THHN is $1.63/ft
Single conductor is the correct way to install. You'll have to get a white #6 cut as it can't be re identified with colored tape or whatever.
6/3 nm typically comes with a bare #10 for the grounding conductor.
You might need a hole saw if the prefabricated ko's don't line up. Try to avoid this cost even if it means putting the sub lower than you initially wanted.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
6/3 nm is $1.73/ft
Three #6's THHN and a #10 THHN is $1.63/ft
Single conductor is the correct way to install. You'll have to get a white #6 cut as it can't be re identified with colored tape or whatever.
6/3 nm typically comes with a bare #10 for the grounding conductor.
You might need a hole saw if the prefabricated ko's don't line up. Try to avoid this cost even if it means putting the sub lower than you initially wanted.
Excellent. Thank you. I'm not married to any panel location so I will move it wherever I need to get it to line up with the KO on the main panel.

One more follow up. You said 4 lock nuts. Does that mean one inside and one outside of each panel? And the grounding bushings, those just get tied to the #10 wire by stripping a small section off and tightening down the lug?

Thank you for all the tips!
 

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One more follow up. You said 4 lock nuts. Does that mean one inside and one outside of each panel?
I'm wondering this too. For my subpanel I will need a conduit nipple, like this (image not accurate; product has wider diameter), but it does not have lips; it's just a tube with threads. So to use this you use a lock nut on both sides?
BTW my panel is going to be outside so I am wondering if using a nipple like that with 4 locknuts will be ok?

Unless I can find this in store. This would be better as I wouldn't have to worry about the height of the knockouts of the two boxes from the wall.
 

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This might be a silly question, but can I buy #6-3 cable and pull of the jacket so I can run the 3 wires loose inside the conduit? I think it's cheaper than buying per foot of individual wires. Also, is there any harm running the ground wire that comes bundled in the #6-3 w/ground cable? Trying to understand the recommendation to go with #10 for ground.

Thanks for the reply! I will go with the 4" rigid nipple.



I'll keep the post updated as I go along... hope to get it done soon. :)
You can't strip 6/3 NM and use it in a conduit. I don't know what your inspector would say but, as far as I understand it, you should be able to make it your choice of NM cable without conduit or THHN with conduit. You can't mix the two approaches. I agree with those who suggest the conduit since it is so easy in this case.

You weren't wrong in your first description. 6/3 NM cable always includes a ground wire plus two hots and neutral.

I don't think anyone's mentioned it yet: do not jumper ground and neutral in your sub-panel.
 

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I'm wondering this too. For my subpanel I will need a conduit nipple, like this (image not accurate; product has wider diameter), but it does not have lips; it's just a tube with threads. So to use this you use a lock nut on both sides?
BTW my panel is going to be outside so I am wondering if using a nipple like that with 4 locknuts will be ok?

Unless I can find this in store. This would be better as I wouldn't have to worry about the height of the knockouts of the two boxes from the wall.
I think the type of nipple you're showing is for bringing conduit out of the box and angling back to a wall. You would probably be better off with a straight nipple to go box to box.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You can't strip 6/3 NM and use it in a conduit. I don't know what your inspector would say but, as far as I understand it, you should be able to make it your choice of NM cable without conduit or THHN with conduit. You can't mix the two approaches. I agree with those who suggest the conduit since it is so easy in this case.

You weren't wrong in your first description. 6/3 NM cable always includes a ground wire plus two hots and neutral.

I don't think anyone's mentioned it yet: do not jumper ground and neutral in your sub-panel.
Understood, thanks. I will go with conduit and THHN.

Hard to see in my photo, but I have a ground bar on the bottom right of the sub. The other bars will be my neutrals.
 

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Save yourself the trouble of not having the correct holes not line up because one is deeper than the other.
I would just use the 6/3 w/g and come out of the nearest 3/4 hole that allows you to hit the bottom of the panel.
 

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I think the type of nipple you're showing is for bringing conduit out of the box and angling back to a wall. You would probably be better off with a straight nipple to go box to box.
What? No the offset nipple does the exact same thing as the straight nipple, it is just offset so that it can compensate in differences of height from wall, etc.
 

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What? No the offset nipple does the exact same thing as the straight nipple, it is just offset so that it can compensate in differences of height from wall, etc.
I think with as many years in the trade as he has he is well aware of how to use a basic part.
 

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I think with as many years in the trade as he has he is well aware of how to use a basic part.
Maybe you can use that offset nipple for conduit offsets but it certainly can be used for connecting boxes close together and that is what they are often used for! I've never seen one of those used for a conduit offset and it doesn't look like its meant for connecting to conduit because you'd need a coupling to do it.
 

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Check to see if your holes line up. If the don't you can certainly used an offset nipple between the panels. Straight always looks better when possible. The locknuts go on the outside and the inside of each as you described. You described the insulated grounding bushing right too. I suggest you by another nipple to pass branch circuits around if needed. That one can be left empty until needed and shouldn't have to be larger than a 1" although this is totally up to you.
 

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Maybe you can use that offset nipple for conduit offsets but it certainly can be used for connecting boxes close together and that is what they are often used for! I've never seen one of those used for a conduit offset and it doesn't look like its meant for connecting to conduit because you'd need a coupling to do it.
It's commonly called a "box" offset. It is for transitioning from wall to panel or junction box. I have never used one simply because I have the capability to bend 2" conduit. But not everyone has that luxury. If you couldn't bend conduit then that could be your ticket. And yes, you use a coupling on one end.

To use a fitting like that to tie two panels together doesn't usually make sense, though it's not forbidden. Why not just go straight out of one panel and straight into the next. It would be just short of a miracle for that tiny offset to precisely line up two panels. The only thing it might help would be a depth issue between the two.

I think it would still look Jakey.
 
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