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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am working on finishing my basement. I am building a 4'X8' room to enlcose my furnace and water heater. The return ductwork for the furnace is currently snug against the concrete wall. Should this be re-worked so I can get framing and insulation and drywall behind the ductwork? This will be an expensive thing to do, but can be done. I want to build properly up to code.
Thanks.
MountainDIY
 

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How are you supplying make up air for the furnace & water heater? Also, have you checked codes to see if any type of Heat, smoke or CO detection required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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I am supplying the make up air passively through vents. THere are no sleeping rooms in the basement so no CO detectors are requried and just one central smoke detector is required.
 

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Regardless if there are not any sleeping quarters down stairs, I would still install one. As for vents, keep in mind that your local fire codes may mandate how those vents are installed, etc., and if the room has to have certain materials & a fire rated door. It would be better to have all bases covered, then have it come bite you later on.

Also, if this is going to be a finished space, regardless if no bedrooms, there needs to be one other form of egress other than stairs leading up to the top floor for an exit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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Right I have two egress windows that meet code and my smoke/co detectors are up the code. My question was the return ductwork for the furnace is currently snug against the concrete foundation wall. Should this be re-worked so I can get and insulation and drywall behind the ductwork? It is in it own room. Can I just not finished the furnace room?
 

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When you say you are passively supplying make up air, do you mean you have a dedicated fresh air supply from the exterioe for the furnace or are you just using interior air for combustion and the replacing that with air from cracks and openings to the exterior?

Personally, the value of insulating a wall below grade is minimal since the wall and soil temperatures are warmer that the exterior air during the heating season. The lack of insulation can be a benefit when you go to AC operation since the soil is a valuable temperature moderator.

Dick
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have the make up air dedicated from the exterior. We live at 9000 feet and have very harsh winters and no air conditioning (cooling). Basement walls are required to be insulated (R13) so my guess is that we will have to move the duct work in order to do so but I just want to make sure since if will cost extra. Any insight would be helpful. Just wondering if we can keep the furnace/water heater room unfinished.
 

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Pull it, then when you put it back, you will have to most likely have to cut the other end of the duct a little shorter to either pull from the wall, or have to remove a section to relocate where it would be better for how you are going to finish the space. Take some pictures and post to give a better idea overall what we are looking at for the mechanicals that you have to work with if you do not mind.

Also, could post in the Project showcase if really going to make this a space that will turn out to be A+.
 
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