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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
TLDR: basement has a damp trench along the wall, what should I use for paneling so that it won't mold up.
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I've been replacing wet drywall from the recent hurricane. 2/3 of the basement is dry closest or kitchen/cabinets exposed cement behind it. I discovered the 20' of wall the run against the outer wall aren't drywall; Looks like a former owner used 1/8" veneer panels, covered it in popcorn-ish textured wallpaper, then painted the wallpaper to look like drywall, I wouldn't be able to match it, need to replace it. My concern is there is a 1" gap, full of drainage gravel, running between the basement floor and wall that run to the sump pits, the gravel feels very damp after it rains, I think it would be a bad idea to put regular drywall in front of this, correct? what should I use instead (ideally it would be something paintable to match the rest of the basement)

Bedrock Asphalt Road surface Font Slope

The basement is tiled and has baseboard heat, can't get a useful photo of that, I cut out the paneling behind the stair case to see what going on back there, the walls have a 2x4 frame in front of (not over) the gap
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Wood Floor Flooring Material property Hardwood

water poured in from the back door down this corner, split level, moisture reader is testing dry now but there is some nasty growth on the back of the bottom of wallpaper
(that's a 4" fan blowing into a hole i made in the wall)
 

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Water, drywall, never a good combination.
Blue board comes to mind also Hardy board. Hardy might be better in your situation because hurricanes do happen over and over to the same basic areas.
 

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That gap is there to catch water leaking thru the wall, the foundation should have been draped with sheet poly to direct the water down and not let it evaporate and disperse.
Wood Automotive tire Floor Line Flooring
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
[/QUOTE]
That gap is there to catch water leaking thru the wall, the foundation should have been draped with sheet poly to direct the water down and not let it evaporate and disperse.
View attachment 664775
We def don't have plastic in between the walls. some are painted with drylock, some not, that's all the water proofing it has. Should I have plastic between the joists then hang panels or would that be pointless?
 

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retired framer
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We def don't have plastic, 2walls are just 3' deep closet normal drywall from the front but inside us the painted cinderblock walls. Should I staple plastic sheet between the new drywall and studs!?
Did you have mod from before the flood or do you think the flood caused all of what you found?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Did you have mod from before the flood or do you think the flood caused all of what you found?
The basement never flooded, water came in from under the back door, I made a towel blockade while it was happening, some water tricked down the corner (blue in photo), the wall got soaked and so did a small corner of carpet (between the green lines), but no water pooling in the basement.
Wood Gas Flooring Electrical wiring Wire


I don't think there is any visible mold from this incident yet.

The wall on the right side is made out of veneer panels is 16' across and there baseboard radiator covers the entire bottom so I don't know what I'll find back there but I haven't found visible mold in the chunks i took out so far. (it does smell moldy or at least dank back there)
 

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The basement never flooded, water came in from under the back door, I made a towel blockade while it was happening, some water tricked down the corner (blue in photo), the wall got soaked and so did a small corner of carpet (between the green lines), but no water pooling in the basement.
View attachment 664866

I don't think there is any visible mold from this incident yet.

The wall on the right side is made out of veneer panels is 16' across and there baseboard radiator covers the entire bottom so I don't know what I'll find back there but I haven't found visible mold in the chunks i took out so far. (it does smell moldy or at least dank back there)
So if you are finding any old mold, you didn't have a problem other than the flood, you only need to replace what you had. The important detail to watch out for is house air getting behind the wall when you are done. The concrete wall will be the same temp as the dirt outside so moist air from the house coming into contact with it will cool and moisture will condense. If you are not seeing evidence of that you didn't really have a problem. It doesn't matter what you use for wall sheeting, in a flood it will always want to be opened for drying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
just took out a 2'x2' square to see whats going on in there. The paneling stop at the top of the steal baseboard radiator back panel, which is all rusted on the bottom. And it looks like they tried to wallpaper the cinderblock walls before putting up panels FML =P
 

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just took out a 2'x2' square to see whats going on in there. The paneling stop at the top of the steal baseboard radiator back panel, which is all rusted on the bottom. And it looks like they tried to wallpaper the cinderblock walls before putting up panels FML =P
If you don't have insulation, the metal would be cold when the heat is off and room condensation could cause the rust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
If you don't have insulation, the metal would be cold when the heat is off and room condensation could cause the rust.
The baseboard radiator's metal frame is over that trench, pretty obvious the heat was added many years before the walls or tiles were put in. The edge of the radiator cover disappeared into the drywall. It's basically doing what that poly film should be doing. It's one half assed project covering up an older half assed project.

It's all got to go.

But TY for the info. It's a good starting point.
 

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An idea from a past project I did.
Clean all the exterior walls down to the block. I suppose the DryLock walls should be okay.
I have actually used a pressure washer for this...twice. Your trench, though, needs to be protected from any loose stuff that is removed. You don't want to clog its ability to drain.
After it is dry, (some dehumidifiers will help) cover it all with DryLock or some other dependable sealer.
I used an elastomeric for roof coating. It can be rolled on but it can be sprayed with an airless. This gave a much more even coating. You could back roll it to make sure it really gets in there and bonds.
If an airless is used, make sure the device can spray threw a large tip designed for heavy materials.The unit I used was nothing fancy. Wagner marketed it as a once a month use unit back in the early 90's. But it does use a hopper. Not a hose. This could be why it worked when I was told a airless paint sprayer can't spray elastomeric.

Frame your walls between you and the trench. If you use wood, seal the crap out of them prior with some good water sealer...multiple coats...Heck, a Hudson sprayer works fine. You cut off an end of a 2 x 4...dip it into a bucket of water sealer before nailing it up...or in...or on.
But, here is the tricky part. Cover the other side of the frame with styrofoam board insulation. Glue it to your frame. If you go with polypropylene plastic, Use Henry's 802 Wet Patch to fasten it. It will hold that plastic to any thing it sticks to.
Maybe, incorporate in a couple of access panels, for inspection purposes down the road.
Maybe, have them placed so that a high velocity fan, exhausting from one, could draw air in through another from a temporary dry day outside, if that ever happens.

Also, if your drain gravel does not seem to drain well...maybe it's full of small crap.
Use a large wet vac and suck up the rocks. DO this until you see clean rocks when emptying the wet vac.
Clean all the sucked up rocks. Before putting them back in, check how well water drains out should water get back in there again.
And of course Check that sump pump for ideal performance.

Just some ideas that have worked and still are working.
Good luck with those containers of worms.
 

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An idea from a past project I did.
Clean all the exterior walls down to the block. I suppose the DryLock walls should be okay.
I have actually used a pressure washer for this...twice. Your trench, though, needs to be protected from any loose stuff that is removed. You don't want to clog its ability to drain.
After it is dry, (some dehumidifiers will help) cover it all with DryLock or some other dependable sealer.
I used an elastomeric for roof coating. It can be rolled on but it can be sprayed with an airless. This gave a much more even coating. You could back roll it to make sure it really gets in there and bonds.
If an airless is used, make sure the device can spray threw a large tip designed for heavy materials.The unit I used was nothing fancy. Wagner marketed it as a once a month use unit back in the early 90's. But it does use a hopper. Not a hose. This could be why it worked when I was told a airless paint sprayer can't spray elastomeric.

Frame your walls between you and the trench. If you use wood, seal the crap out of them prior with some good water sealer...multiple coats...Heck, a Hudson sprayer works fine. You cut off an end of a 2 x 4...dip it into a bucket of water sealer before nailing it up...or in...or on.
But, here is the tricky part. Cover the other side of the frame with styrofoam board insulation. Glue it to your frame. If you go with polyethylene plastic, Use Henry's 802 Wet Patch to fasten it. It will hold that plastic to any thing it sticks to...Which would not be water.
Maybe, incorporate in a couple of access panels, for inspection purposes down the road.
Maybe, have them placed so that a high velocity fan, exhausting from one, could draw air in through another from a temporary dry day outside, if that ever happens.

Also, if your drain gravel does not seem to drain well...maybe it's full of small crap.
Use a large wet vac and suck up the rocks. DO this until you see clean rocks when emptying the wet vac.
Clean all the sucked up rocks. Before putting them back in, check how well water drains out should water get back in there again.
And of course Check that sump pump for ideal performance.

Just some ideas that have worked and still are working.
Good luck with those containers of worms.
 

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Oops. I was trying to correct a word and duplicated my reply. polypropylene is actually polyethylene.
 
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