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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Attached are two pictures of a baseboard transition b/w carpet and hardwood that was installed by the builder of our house. We had no say as to what was done, since we bought the house as a spec house. First pic is standing in doorway between kitchen and dining room to the right, 2nd pic is from in dining room looking towards kitchen. The hardwood has shoe molding with the baseboard, while the carpet does not have shoe molding. The top of molding is slightly different in height between the carpet and hardwood, so that block breaks it up, so you dont really see the height difference because they are not butted up against each other. Does anyone know if the block that transitions between the two floors is a specialty piece of baseboard, does it have a name? Its not just a solid piece of wood, the top edges of the block all have small chamfers on them. Was not sure if you can buy this somewhere, or if it was just extra carpentry work.

I am asking this, because I want to do something similar in our basement that I am finishing. The upstairs flooring does not have a transition strip between tho 2 flooring types, the carpet is just shimmed to match the hardwood. In our basement I have carpet going to 1/8" vinyl and have a transition strip connecting the two. (http://www.covebase-n-transitions.c...rpet-to-Resilient-Floor-Transition-Strip.html) The link is to the transition strip we are using for the carpet to vinyl. It has 5/16" gap for carpet to be tucked into, and then a 1/8" notch for the vinyl to slide under. What I want to do is where the transition strip comes up to the wall, I want to place a similar block as seen in the photos up against the wall, and have the transition strip run right up to it. That way I can have molding at diiffernt heights to the left and right of that block (carpet approx 3/8" off subfloor) and vinyl (1/8" off subfloor), but then the block breaks up that height difference, and I do not need to rip down the molding in the carpet areas to match.

Few questions
1. Does anyone know what that block is called, is it a specialty molding, can I buy it somewhere, or just need to do some extra wood work?
2. Does the basement install of moldings with that block sound good?

Let me know if you need clarification on anything, I tried to include all pertinent info.

Thanks,
Steve
 

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Tileguy
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That one looks kind of simple and home made compared to the baseboard profile. You can buy those things at home centers. They may be called "baseboard terminals" or something like that. I have heard people also call them "plinth blocks" but that really isn't a plinth block in my thinking. You could have some made easy enough or maybe even make them yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Now that I look at that thing I'm thinking it isn't any kind of a standard item in trim-work, it looks out of place there to me.
It happens at 4 or 6 locations on the first floor, mainly in the open foyer/open family room layout where carpet and hardwood meet. Where the hardwood meets carpet at doors like in our office den, there door casing and trim seperate the molding on hardwood from molding on carpet.
 

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Tileguy
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It happens at 4 or 6 locations on the first floor, mainly in the open foyer/open family room layout where carpet and hardwood meet. Where the hardwood meets carpet at doors like in our office den, there door casing and trim seperate the molding on hardwood from molding on carpet.
Oh yow you see them here and there but I think they are conjured-up on-site. Different floor coverings require different baseboard elevations sometime and that's a way to help disguise the change-up. I've done it myself but I always had to make my own. I have seen similar objects in home centers but don't know for sure what they would be called.
 

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Why not just rip a 1/4 inch off the base and run it on around the corner so the tops will match. What is there now does not look good IMHO. It looks like something made up on the spot.

A suggestion if you are wanting to go that way, why not go with a wooden corner guard like the one below. If it isn't thick enough then you could make a plinth block under the guard to kill the base into.
 

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That's one ugly way to make that corner.
Install the base by setting short scraps of base under it where that hardwood is and keep all of it at the same height at the top when making that corner.
The 1/4 rd. covers up the gap, in your case I'd consider using shoe instead of 1/4. That big 1/4 round looks kind of clunky to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
That's one ugly way to make that corner.
Install the base by setting short scraps of base under it where that hardwood is and keep all of it at the same height at the top when making that corner.
The 1/4 rd. covers up the gap, in your case I'd consider using shoe instead of 1/4. That big 1/4 round looks kind of clunky to me.
This is how my kitchen/dinning/family room are where hardwood meets carpet. I am not looking to change this area. What I want to do is use the same concept idea in basement, at the location where I will have a transition/reducer to go from carpet to vinyl. Since carpet is thicker than the 1/8" vinyl, I took my options as ripping the molding down 1/4" so they would be same height, or do something as shown in attached picture. Do not really want to rip it down, don't have a table saw, and have not had the best cuts in ripping with circular saw. I know I could make a jig and all that to help. The picture shown is on a flat wall, where these two floors meet.

In the picture is what my thoughts were for doing the basement, to the left is carpet with molding, to the right is vinyl with molding and shoe (plan to use shoe, not 1/4 round). The transition/reducer connects the two floors, and my whole question is how to transition the molding between the two floors, so I was thinking of using the plinth at the location where the transition is to transition between the molding on the two floors, along with them being different heights. Drawing is not quite to scale, you can click on the link to see a better picture of the transition from my original post.

Thanks,
Steve
 

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Pro Flooring Installer
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It would look better if the carpet installer had done a better job. There should be no dip in the carpet on that corner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It would look better if the carpet installer had done a better job. There should be no dip in the carpet on that corner.
I understand that, I had no say in it. The house was built for someone else, they lost financing, we bought house as a spec house because price was dropped significantly cause builder did not want to carry it, never noticed that dip until you pointed it out, but this is an area upstairs that I am not changing, my work is in the basement.
 
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