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I have a situation where I only have 12/2 yellow on hand. Is it ok to use 12/2 yellow wire to hook up baseboard heaters and water heater? Or is it still required that I use only red?:eek:
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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I have a situation where I only have 12/2 yellow on hand. Is it ok to use 12/2 yellow wire to hook up baseboard heaters and water heater? Or is it still required that I use only red?:eek:
Got me confused.... what is 12/2 yellow... do ya mean the cable color of NM.

And that then begs the question, what is 12/2 red.

Is your question directed as to the AWG of the wire, or the color of uncabled THHN wire in conduit.??
 

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Where are you located?

I think red colored cable is only a requirement in Canada.
 

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The gauge of the wire is determined by the load being placed on it.
I've never seen #12 used on a water heater unless it's a small plug in 110V, only # 10..
 

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The red cable is not a requirement. It is only an option.

If your circuit breaker is 20 amps or less then the 12/2 yellow is acceptable.
 

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The color of the sheathing on the wire by code changed awhile back.
I remember when it was all white sheathing, and the size was stamped in ink on the sheathing.
This made the inspectors have to actually look and read the wire sizes in a rough in inspection.
Now with the new code, the inspector can just look at the color of the wire and know what size it is without getting face into each little section to see if it is correct size.

white is 14
yellow is 12
I thought 10 was orange, but it could be red. then there is #8 wire.

None of this has anything to do with what the poster wants to do.
I have a 20 amp breaker and some #16 wire and want to connect a water heater ... is that ok :no:
 

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Again is why location is important.my area and I thought would be federal and not local.
They changed the color of the wire sheathing for only 1 purpose I know of, so inspectors could identify it.
Here is a photo of what I have in my van, 12-2 use to be white and same as 14-2.
They did not mandate the 12-2 be changed to yellow because it was pretty.
Was so the inspector could stand in a room and see what different wire was being used and for what circuits.
Maybe not code, But I can not buy 12-2 in white in New Mexico for several years.
And when the poster replied he only had yellow wire lying around, this is what I am thinking of.
 

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It looks pretty. Inspectors like it for the reasons stated. But it is not code unless you have a local amendment.
The red cable is called Heatex. It is used for 240 volt circuits and has red and black instead of black and white. But it is not required by code to be used.

 

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Standard Romex is white: 14, yellow: 12, orange: 10.

There are different codes in different places, but I'd be surprised to see a modern water heater that takes 12g wire. I do like the answer that if the breaker is 20amp you can use 12g. But again, I'd be very surprised to see a water heater on a 20amp circuit.
 

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baseboard heater - you will have to check the specs of the heater and pick the right circuit, then wire.

always
1. current draw of fixture
2. determines circuit size
3. determines wire size
 

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It looks pretty. Inspectors like it for the reasons stated. But it is not code unless you have a local amendment.
The red cable is called Heatex. It is used for 240 volt circuits and has red and black instead of black and white. But it is not required by code to be used.

Joed... Couple questions.... where coded or used, same ratings as Romex NM. Is it NM I guess is my question.

What guages does it come in, OP implied his red was 12... but if it's use is for 240, does it come in #10 also.

Also, is it's only configuartion 2 wire, does it come 3 wire with ground for appliances and bigger guage than 10.

Thanks
 

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The color of the sheathing on the wire by code changed awhile back.
I remember when it was all white sheathing, and the size was stamped in ink on the sheathing.
This made the inspectors have to actually look and read the wire sizes in a rough in inspection.
Now with the new code, the inspector can just look at the color of the wire and know what size it is without getting face into each little section to see if it is correct size.

white is 14
yellow is 12
I thought 10 was orange, but it could be red. then there is #8 wire.

None of this has anything to do with what the poster wants to do.
I have a 20 amp breaker and some #16 wire and want to connect a water heater ... is that ok :no:
You are correct, Fun. 10 is orange, just bought some to hook up my MIG Welder. :thumbsup:
 

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MTN REMODEL LLC said:
Yep.... I've never installed an electric WH... guess I could look it up... anyone know the normal wattage.
Most 40-50 gallon tank water heaters are around 4500-5500 watts I believe. We have a 30 gallon single burner water heater in a mobile home that uses 3500 watts. It happens to be on a 20 amp breaker. :yes:
 

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Here is a link to the heatex cable. It appears to come in sizes up to #2.

http://www.nexans.ca/eservice/Navigate.nx?CZ=Canada&language=en_CA&navigationId=207009

Standards
National : CSA C22.2 N° 48-M90
Description

CSA File #LL23462 Class 5821 02

NMD90 (Red) HEATEX* is a variant of copper conductor NMD90 CANADEX, with NO WHITE WIRE in the 2 conductor cable. This cable is designed for use on 240-volt systems where there is no NEUTRAL, therefore the cable has a black and a red conductor in addition to the bare bonding wire. To make identification easier it is usually supplied with a RED overall jacket. It should NOT be used on 110-volt systems as there is no neutral, and it is dangerous to use either the red or the black as a neutral. Large sizes are available for use with electric furnaces.

Application

For open or concealed wiring in dry or damp locations where not exposed to mechanical injury.
Minimum recommended handling temperature minus 25°C (with suitable handling procedures).
Maximum conductor temperature 90°C.
Specifically designed for 240 volt heating circuits.
 
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