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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wish it was just a standard square floor, but it's not. It's angled up at the rear to give more clearance to the stairway underneath. It was previously carpet, so it didn't matter how it lined up, and the angled board just had carpet up to the edges. Can't do that here.

I planned to bring the wood through the doorway up to the angled piece, and probably leave that painted white, unless you have other suggestions.

Previously, there was just base molding from the front of the closet, along the floor, cut at an angle to match the angle at the back. Now I need to figure out something to cover the angled edges.

Also of note, from front-to-back, the left side of the closet is about 1/2" deeper than the right side, along the floor. Going to be a fun last board to cut.





 

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Install flooring first.
Jambs and casing next, the two side pieces cut to the angle of the wall.
For the last piece that is going to lay on an angle I would use the next taller base width and cope the two ends. Rip the bottom at an angle and remove just enough stock so the two tops of the baseboard meet at the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yessir, plan was to do the flooring and then jambs/casing. That part I can handle, it's the trim that's throwing me off. Not quite following you exactly how to run the rest of the molding though...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think you say to run the new base molding in the way the previous molding was run, cut at an angle to match the sloped part of the floor?

Which 'last' piece are you referring to? Or, are you saying to continue the base up the sides on the angled piece, and then cope the last piece against the upper part of the back wall? I think I'm following. The taller base will let me cut the angle to match the angled piece of 'floor'.


Someone else had a great idea too. Just box the stupid thing in. LOL
 

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If someone had of boxed it in (now it would be sort of a wedge shape) that would give you room to store shoes and not have to bend over to pick them up.
Sort of a shelf.
 
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Not 100% sure to be honest.
That's why I suggested that one back piece will have to be the next size taller so as it's tipped it will still run from top all the way tight to the floor.
To picture it take a piece of paper, measure the length, now measure from corner to corner, longer, right?
 

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I may use just something flat for base in there.
Find the angle where the two side pieces will meet the back wall. The angle cut will be longer then the the height of your side baseboards, rip material the same thickness to the required height for the back wall for the tops to come out the same, also this rip on the top will need to be on the same angle as the side cuts where to come out 'flat/level' with the other baseboards on the side.
 

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That will work if you have a table saw.
It's just a closet, does not need to be perfect.
 

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If the sides are angled down, will the top being coped still match up?
probably cope will not match.

in higher end homes a custom piece with proper profile would be made for the back piece.
usually I just use flat trim for this sort of thing. Or profiled side pieces and a flat piece tall enough across the back then the two sides butt to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
In a higher end home, this stupid closet would not exist like this.:laughing:

I do have a table saw, but, not sure I'm following here exactly.

When you say flat base, are you talking about rectangle trim? Or something like "PFD2" below? (bottom row, 2nd from right):




This is what I used in my other closet. Planned on using it in here if possible, not necessary though. (My 2nd coping attempt)
 

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I mean something like a 1x4 no profile at all.

With what you have you "may" be able to cut the sides down about 1" or something (cut off the bottom)
run the back piece then cut the angles and mitre them on a 45 and cope as you did, the exact amount you need to cut off the side pieces can be figured out by marking the wall at the height of the Back piece at each corner, then using a level carry the line along the side walls, only need a few inches, then measure to the floor from the line at cut to this height. Cut your angle of the back wall and 45degree inside mitre and cope. sand out a little extra on the profile as needed or caulk with latex caulk as needed, paint and it should blend right in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm kind of leaning towards framing it square. It would be the simplest option I think.

The other part of me says "Just caulk the angled piece, paint it, shut the door, forget about it, and rent the place out.
 

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I'm kind of leaning towards framing it square. It would be the simplest option I think.

The other part of me says "Just caulk the angled piece, paint it, shut the door, forget about it, and rent the place out.
Oh shoot, if its just a rental, Id just put molding on the sides and not worry about the angled face section. When you go to sell it, take the hour or two and 35 bucks to frame it out square. You can never have too much storage!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You're right, storage is a premium, especially in these split-entry style houses.

Yes, well, we own it, but are pretty far upside-down with the market (bought in spring of 2007). Senseless to keep putting this money into renovations, when we can have a house already done for less money or the same than this one cost/is costing us. Most likely going to just rent it out.
 

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You're right, storage is a premium, especially in these split-entry style houses.

Yes, well, we own it, but are pretty far upside-down with the market (bought in spring of 2007). Senseless to keep putting this money into renovations, when we can have a house already done for less money or the same than this one cost/is costing us. Most likely going to just rent it out.
I was/is in the same boat on a townhouse I bought in '05. Good luck on getting it rented. Have you asked your lender if they would modify the note? If you haven't, you should. And do it while its still your primary residence.
 
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