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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an old barn that looks great,especially since I keep up with the painting. It is the traditional red with white trim. I have always used a linseed oil based paint made by Valspar and with proper prep the paint job lasts a good while. The problem I'm having now is that New York state no longer allows the oil based paints. Valspar now has a latex barn paint which is fortified with Linseed oil. I'm reluctant to switch to this as this painting and prep is a lot of work to do to have to use an inferior product.I have always been told that oil paint is vastly superior to latex for exterior work,especially for an old ,weathered building in harsh conditions such as mine.The alternative would be to travel out of state for the other paint.Also, can I paint latex over oil without a ton of sanding? Your advice and comments please ?
 

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With many coats of oil paint already there, latex MAY just peel the paint off the wall in sheets. Latex is much better for exterior painting. It allows the wood to release moisture though the paint. But oil is harder and less flexible and when you paint latex over this a bad reaction can occur. It may not, seems the science cannot give use positive results consistently here. Best choice is to find "Fresh Paints" from Europe. It is a low VOC oil paint for this purpose. It is far superior than any available in USA or Canada. USA has only been developing new paints in acrylics and latex. Europe had continued to perfect oils.
 

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Bob is right - alkyd (oil-based) paint molecules are very rigidly bonded, making them great for chip resistance on furniture or trim. Latex paints are breathable and flexible, allowing them to shrink and expand with the temperature fluctuations of the substrate.

The easiest, longest lasting solution is to scrape the barn to remove all loose paint, 1 coat exterior primer (SW A-100 Oil Primer), and 2 coats high quality exterior latex (SW Super Paint, or SW A-100 [cheaper]).

The *best* option would be to completely remove all oil based paint, then 1 coat primer and 2 coats latex (same recommendation as above).

The concern is that the rigid alkyd paint will "break" due to temperature fluctuations and damage the upper coat of latex. Primer will help promote adhesion and protect the alkyd layer, but make sure the primer is an oil primer!
 

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The problem I'm having now is that New York state no longer allows the oil based paints.
When did this happen? I am in Syracuse NY and last time I checked I could get Benjamin Moore's Oil Based house paint.
 

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When did this happen? I am in Syracuse NY and last time I checked I could get Benjamin Moore's Oil Based house paint.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/05/23/AR2005052301644_pf.html

Similar rules have been in effect for a while in California, and restrictive oil-paint laws are being crafted in many northern states. But the mid-Atlantic region has not made as much progress reducing overall pollution as New England has, so the paint restrictions kicked in first in this area. Since Jan. 1, stores in the District, Northern Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New York have not been able to order most of the oil-based paints commonly used in household and commercial applications
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmmmmmmmm. I think what I'm hearing is to go out of state to buy the paint I need. I always scrape the loose paint but complete removal is out of the question.Thanks for the responses.
 

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Check Sherwin Williams near you for oil-based exterior paint. Ask for SWP (yes, three letters) - it is a product that is very near obsolescence so you may get it cheap. Expect some puzzled looks though if that store has already phased it out. The store will be able to look for it in the vicinity, however, and may have it delivered to the store for you to pickup for free.
 

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You can just give everyhing a coat of oil based primer. Then you can top coat with latex with no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ok ,Tim ! After visiting your site I can see that you know your stuff. So what you suggest I do to repaint over the Valspar oil based,linseed oil paint that is now on my barn? They do have a Latex based ,linseed oil paint available, or do you suggest a Sherman Williams product? (my cousin is a rep!) What about prep? Apply an oil based primer before painting the latex, as mentioned earlier? Also, what about a quality solid color stain in latex? Thanks in advance.
 

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Barn Painting

I would recommend using A 100 Oil based primer over the Valspar oil based, linseed oil paint already on your barn. Then I would recommend either Super Paint, or Duration Paint as your top coat. Prep work should include scraping off any old paint that is peeling, power washing, and treating any mildew problems. Solid stain would work much better than semi-transparent stain because the barn has already been painted in the past. Just remember that most staining will get you 3-5 years of protection, then you need to do it again. Painting your barn will give you longer protection. You can always paint your barn with paint that ultimately looks like you stained it if you like that look. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the advice everyone,especially you Tim.I will heed it. By the way, considering your vocation,do you see the irony in your last name? LOL
 
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