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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is mainly a curiosity.

I live in an city where code requires rigid conduit (with specific exceptions). Often I have seen wire which comes into a box where the insulation is removed only where is wraps around a device screw and then continues on. It may go to another outlet/switch in the same box or exit the box to continue into another conduit.

What is this technique called?

I can see where one does not have to worry about a loose wire connection effecting other devices 'downstream'. But is it a big advantage over using a pig tail?
 

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Sounds like someone being LAZY to me. I personally prefer using pigtails for any connection to an outlet with 2 or more sets of wires. I never use the outlet to pass power onto the rest of a circuit, even if its to an outlet located in the same box.
 

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I saw that a lot in a house I grew up in- built around 1960. I think it was a common practice for some electricians then. Junction boxes were smaller then too and thicker (than what is available today) 14g NM was used mostly everywhere.

I prefer pigtails whenever possible, and don't use receptacles as some do as the junction point for downstream feeders.
 

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In the example described, the metal parts of the receptacle are not being used to pass power to the rest of the circuit. Only one screw on each side of the receptacle is used. There is one joint, that screw, traversed by power serving that receptacle and no joints traversed by power continuing on to the next outlet box. In the traditional pigtail arrangement there is one joint (the wire nut) traversed by power continuing on.

I'm not sure whether this method is disallowed by code.

I have used the term "daisy chaining" to refer to any situation where the power feed enters an outlet box and wires continue on from that point to the next outlet box with or without pigtails or wire nuts and with or without using both screws on the side of the receptacle.
 

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I've seen this in my sister's 50's house, mine same time period, no. seems like a lot of work but I guess when it was done at the time of construction it would of been easier. And, no, I don't know answer to your question.
 

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I can't say for sure, but I cannot see why it would be a violation of the code, as long as only bare wire is wrapped under the screw, and not insulation.
It does seem like a lot of work though; The new THHN wire used in NMB cables is difficult to split, so this would not be an efficient method to use.

I always use the deepest outlet boxes that will fit the application, and use pigtails. The key is to use the deep boxes. If you're trying to splice in a shallow box, the "spliceless" method described by the OP might be better.

FW
 

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This method is tried and true. It is mostly used by older electricians. I like because it allows you to avoid wire nuts and splices. Especially when you have alot of devices. I use it on quad receptacles and multigang switch boxes. For instance, if I have say a 6 gang switch, I'll leave one long hot and loop from switch to switch.
 

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This method is tried and true. It is mostly used by older electricians. I like because it allows you to avoid wire nuts and splices. Especially when you have alot of devices. I use it on quad receptacles and multigang switch boxes. For instance, if I have say a 6 gang switch, I'll leave one long hot and loop from switch to switch.
I will second that motion. :)
 

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The technique is called "Midpoint skinning" and I use in large multigang boxes like InPhase describes. What works for me is to take a long piece of wire, skin it midpoint, leave a loop, skin midpoint, leave a loop and so on. Then tie it to all of the switches, then connect this single pigtail to my power comming in. I've heard guys say they hate when people do this, because it makes it hard to change a device, but if you leave enough of a loop between devices, there isn't a problem.

InPhase277 said:
I use it on quad receptacles and multigang switch boxes. For instance, if I have say a 6 gang switch, I'll leave one long hot and loop from switch to switch.
 

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This method is tried and true. It is mostly used by older electricians. I like because it allows you to avoid wire nuts and splices. Especially when you have alot of devices. I use it on quad receptacles and multigang switch boxes. For instance, if I have say a 6 gang switch, I'll leave one long hot and loop from switch to switch.


How do you skin it without knicking the wire, just with a knife? I did a quad on emt for my parrents garage last night and was unhappy with the mess of wires from pigtTaling the hot and grounds. Maybe I'll try this but will have to get non-clamp down devices. BTW did the full garage and attic in emt, my dad is really good at conduit now.
Jamie
 

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IMHO2 it is harder to "skin" the middle of a wire without nicking which may be why some electricians frown on midpoint skinning.

I have used the tip of a soldering gun to help strip (via melting) small sections of insulation from wires and at least personally have had fewer nicking problems this way.
 

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This method is tried and true. It is mostly used by older electricians. I like because it allows you to avoid wire nuts and splices. Especially when you have alot of devices. I use it on quad receptacles and multigang switch boxes. For instance, if I have say a 6 gang switch, I'll leave one long hot and loop from switch to switch.
+2

I didnt start out doing it this way but it really is easier and without a doubt, takes up less space in a tight box.

as far as stripping that part, I just make two pinches about an inch apart with these and strip a little with a utility knife and peel off. easy
 

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How do you skin it without knicking the wire, just with a knife? I did a quad on emt for my parrents garage last night and was unhappy with the mess of wires from pigtTaling the hot and grounds. Maybe I'll try this but will have to get non-clamp down devices. BTW did the full garage and attic in emt, my dad is really good at conduit now.
Jamie
I just bite into it with my strippers and pull. The insulation will slide along the whole length of the wire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
followup question

I just bite into it with my strippers and pull. The insulation will slide along the whole length of the wire.
It is easy to believe the insulation would slide if you near an end of the wire, say daisy chaining multiple receptacles in a box. But how easy is it when the next device if 15 feet away though conduit? You would want to 'skin' after the wire is pulled.

And thank you to all who relied!
 

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how easy is it when the next device if 15 feet away though conduit? You would want to 'skin' after the wire is pulled.
If that is the case, you would squeeze the wire in the appropriare gauge slot twice and use you razor knife to slice off the small piece of insulation between.

This method is often used to save space in a small jb. It also eliminates a splice which eliminates one potential failure point.
 
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