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They say that paint reveals all, and they aren't kidding:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/h9tbrqpzt0r2m5x/IMG_5990.JPG?dl=0

I'm a complete amateur, so pardon the probably-stupid question. Is this just a case of needing a liberal amount of joint compound going pretty wide to smooth out the joint? Do I need to sand the (pretty fresh) paint before doing so?

I have a few around here, but this one is far and away the most hideous.

Thanks!
 

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They say that paint reveals all, and they aren't kidding:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/h9tbrqpzt0r2m5x/IMG_5990.JPG?dl=0

I'm a complete amateur, so pardon the probably-stupid question. Is this just a case of needing a liberal amount of joint compound going pretty wide to smooth out the joint? Do I need to sand the (pretty fresh) paint before doing so?

I have a few around here, but this one is far and away the most hideous.

Thanks!
It's difficult to tell from the photo but taking into account the shadowing where the right side is darker than the left tells me that the wall itself has a pretty big crown in it. Perhaps the wall was extended at some point and the studs were not installed in line with the existing wall or you just have a warped stud there that's causing a bulge or it may even been poor framing. It doesn't appear to be a drywall finishing issue to me but perhaps a better closeup photo would reveal more. A wall section alignment issue is what it looks like to me.
 

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Hi Brian,
Adding lots of mud always scares me, as that is what often creates the the original problem. My computer is not willing to open the drop box, my issue not DB's but using a 4' straight edge you should be able to get an idea as to how serious the problem is. Low spots are far easier to fix than high spots (aside from sanding) but getting it to look good after painting means it has to be good.

Check with a straight edge and let us know.

Bud
 

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Hi guys - lots of mud scares me too, mostly because I'm an amateur who stinks at it and have a hard time getting a final texture that mimics the almost-orange-peel-but-not-quite that's occurred from many, many layers of roller stipple.

I tried taking another picture, but can't get a better one to come out yet. The effect is most noticeable at night with light from floor lamps.

As to your theories, I think you're spot on. It juts out there which leaves the crowning effect, and I'm assuming that's the stud like you said, seephor. Bud9051, I took a straight edge (actually a level) to it, and there's definitely a downward angle of a few degrees either way you go down the "hill" from where it's raised.

So, at this point, what can I do about it?
 

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What you need to do is to move that lamp. :wink2:

You could add mud to make it flatter, especially to the right. I think I would try removing what's there. Maybe sand down the paint, which is hard, or take a paint scraper to it. Then if it's normal mud, just wet sponge it until you get it all off and pull the tape. If the boards were hung vertically then you have a taper there which is easy to finish. If that wall was previously torn open then you have a very large butt joint(possibly half tapered) which will likely look the same after an amateur does it.
 

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Adding a lot of mud is never the answer. Fix the problem wether it's sanding it down or cutting it out and re-doing it. Then re-tape and mud it with thin coats.

If your totally inexperienced with drywall you might want to get a couple estimates. This repair should not be very costly depending on where you live.
 

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Adding a lot of mud is never the answer. Fix the problem wether it's sanding it down or cutting it out and re-doing it. Then re-tape and mud it with thin coats.

If your totally inexperienced with drywall you might want to get a couple estimates. This repair should not be very costly depending on where you live.
I'm in DC. *Everything* is expensive. :) It's a bit of an eyesore but falls into the DIY-or-not-at-all bucket for me.

I was thinking that a series of thin joint compound applications, feathering further and further, might hide it. But it sounds like you think that's not a good approach. I could try to sand it down, although if it *is* the stud, that won't work.
 

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When you sand it's not going to hard to tell. When you sand you should be sanding compound if you see paper then it's not a joint. Even if it was a stud it would be a more gradual slope. That really looks like a bad joint. But remember I'm looking at a pic I'm not there.
 

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I believe ,as others have said ,that you have a bad stud there.With the paint it's hard to tell how much mud is at that ridge.I would sand the ridge down as much as possible without going thru any of the paper on the drywall.then put a 12" drywall knife on the ridge going out each direction to give you an idea where your at..Not float each side out using the 12" knife .
 

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Hi guys - lots of mud scares me too, mostly because I'm an amateur who stinks at it and have a hard time getting a final texture that mimics the almost-orange-peel-but-not-quite that's occurred from many, many layers of roller stipple.

I tried taking another picture, but can't get a better one to come out yet. The effect is most noticeable at night with light from floor lamps.

As to your theories, I think you're spot on. It juts out there which leaves the crowning effect, and I'm assuming that's the stud like you said, seephor. Bud9051, I took a straight edge (actually a level) to it, and there's definitely a downward angle of a few degrees either way you go down the "hill" from where it's raised.

So, at this point, what can I do about it?
That's what I suspected so you have basically three ways to fix this.

1) Move the light source

2) Remove the drywall in that section, shim out the studs so they're level with the remaining and attach new drywall, finish, sand, prime, paint.

3) Sand the paint with 60 grit to rough it up a bit. find out how far out the section of the wall is from the joint, let's say 1/4". temporarily attach a thin piece of 1/4" drywall or strip of wood to the far end of the wall next to the corner to act as a spacer your straight edge will ride on.

Mix a large amount of hot mud, apply it to the wall essentially filling in the void you get when you place your straight edge from the joint to the spacer you attached. Use the straight edge to level out the mud and don't worry if it's not perfectly smooth or if it has small holes and pockets.

Once the mud has cured, remove the temporary spacer strip and fill the void with hot mud flush with the rest of the mud you just applied. Once that has cured, sand it down a bit with 80 grit to remove high spots and get a level even surface. Sponge it down before skim coating the entire section with regular all-purpose, sand with 120 grit, prime, paint.

It's not advisable to fill large voids with joint compound but it can be done and has been done for years. The key is to use hot mud as it does not shrink, crack and cures in a very short time period.
 

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I'm in DC. *Everything* is expensive. :) It's a bit of an eyesore but falls into the DIY-or-not-at-all bucket for me.

I was thinking that a series of thin joint compound applications, feathering further and further, might hide it. But it sounds like you think that's not a good approach. I could try to sand it down, although if it *is* the stud, that won't work.
I am not an expert, but am a diy'er that has successfully fixed problems like this. If you have time, you can do it yourself.

First thing to do, go to the big box store and get you a five gallon bucket of compound and a 12 in drywall knife. If budget permits, get a few smaller knives as well. I, know, you won't need five gallons, but its not much more expensive that an small bucket, and you will need more than a small bucket.

If you have never mudded before, just do one side of the hump at a time. Put the compound on the wall to the left of the hump, the width of you knife. Place one edge of the knife on the hump and drag the mud down to get your first application. Get is as smooth as possible without divots, but dont worry about small imperfections.

Let that dry, do the other side of the hump.

After that side dries, feather out a wider coat.

You should end up with an area on each side of the hump that feathers out about 18".

I don't care what your budget is , but that room looks like it was just redone and its sanding time, which is a mess.

Get one of these:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Hyde-Dust-Free-Drywall-Hand-Sander-Kit-with-6-Foot-Hose-09165/100659771

To get a nice smooth finish, do what they do to sand down body filler on cars. Block Sand. Sand one way at a 45 degree angle, then the opposite way at a 45 degree angle. In other words, sand in an x pattern. You will never have an uneven sanding job.

May need to do a few touch ups, prime paint the whole wall, and call it done.

Don't know if the pros would agree with the above method but it has worked for me on walls and ceilings. The patch has held with no cracks.
 

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I would not use a 5 gal bucket of mud but hot mud.Get durobond or easy sand 45 minute mud.You will have to mix it but it dries much quicker and does not shrink or crack.If using the 45 minute do not mix more than you think you can use in 30 minutes.Sand this if you need to and then apply a slick coat of topping.
 
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