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I need to cut a lot of fallen limbs that are under a foot thick. I have 2 cheapo chainsaws and frankly I suck using them. Of course I have a sawzall but that's too light duty.


Does any beast exist between the sawzall and a small chainsaw? Something more heavy duty but blade based not chain based?
 

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Back up, what do you have now exactly?
Even a cheap chainsaw with a sharp blade should be able to do what you need if it's used right.
 
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Remodel and New Build GC
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Re: Baby Chain Saws?


Personally,...I don't think Babies ought to use chain saws....but that is just my opinion.


(Guess this shut down might be affecting me...or maybe age...or maybe Jack daniels)

Best...

Edit: I'm pretty sure Jim and Larry have the best advice....:smile:
 

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Naildriver
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Just remembered, I inherited my dad's small Poulan chain saw with a 10" bar. Very light weight and perfect for de-limbing. He bought it just for that reason. After I would fell a tree, he would get to work on the limbs, making it easy to cut the firewood.
 

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Back up, what do you have now exactly?
Even a cheap chainsaw with a sharp blade should be able to do what you need if it's used right.
You'd think, but don't bet on it. One of my next door neighbours, after seeing me out using my Stihl 025 one day, decided he "needed" a chain saw. "Don't cheap-out," I advised him. "Cheap tools aren't worth what they cost. Particularly for something like this." He cheaped-out at a big box store, anyway. I went over to try to help him out. Even after setting the chain tension properly (it had been way too tight out-of-the-box) and getting it running, it was still nearly worthless. I finally set his piece-of-garbage el cheapo aside, grabbed my Stihl, and finished the job for him.

Even the wrench they'd provided with the saw was worthless. I had to go get a real wrench out of my toolbox so I could loosen the bar nut to retension the chain.

He returned the el cheapo saw to the store and gave up on the idea of owning a chain saw. Probably just as well.

A few years ago I bought one of these: Tanaka TCS33EDTP/12 32.2cc 12-Inch Top Handle Chain Saw with Pure Fire Engine for light tasks. Other than a propensity to bleed chain oil like crazy when stored (I now drain it before storing it), it's been a pretty decent little saw. Starts easily & reliably. Runs smoothly. Cuts well. Well-balanced. Light enough to one-hand under "challenging" conditions--if you know what you're doing. (Where "challenging" is defined as "generally considered unwise" ;))
 

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Ayuh,...... The thing with chainsaws,..... Any chainsaw,..
Is how sharp the chain is,..... 'n I can sharpen a chain,..... ;)

The box store home-owner saws come with anti-kick-back safety chains, which Suck,......
The rakers/ riders, aka: the safety parts of the chain are too damn high, keepin' the cuttin' teeth outa the wood,.......
A few minutes with a flat file will "Fix" some of 'em, others I just toss,....

My Dad bought one of those little Poulon's back in the early '70s, a 12" or maybe a 14" bar, top handle saw,......
Great for one handed use,.....
If the wood is big enough to use 2 hands, the wood is to big for the saw, even though the bar will reach across,....
I was still usin' it 'bout 10 years ago, buckin' up pallets for my outdoor boiler,......
It was gettin' tired, so I went 'n bought an Echo 341, another top handle climber's saw, 14" bar,.....

The reason I went with the Echo, over a Stihl climber's top handle saw, is 'cause the powerhead, matches the powerhead on my gas powered winch,.....
They're both Echo 341s, though dressed slightly differently,.....

As for articranger's problem, I question just how sharp their chains are,.?..?....
If it's Ever touched the dirt, it's dull,.....
 

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I would rent a chain saw and exercise caution when using it. A 15" to 18" bar chain saw will take care of these logs in short order. Important thing is to led the chain do the cutting and not to try to force it through the wood. It should have a chain oiling mechanism and good idea to verify that the chamber has chain oil in it before leaving the tool rental shop.

Up to 6 inch diameter limbs there are a number of battey powered saws that work well. For 12" logs that are green it takes less power than if they have cured by sitting for a few months. Pine is easier to cut than oak or walnut so type of tree has a bearing as well.

Consider calling one of the guys on Craigslist that do "brush removal" as they will cut it and haul it to the dump for less than the cost of buying a chainsaw. I would put off a project like this until the Covid-19 situation has significantly improved as you don't want to get an injury that requires spending time in the waiting room at the local hospital. And don't think that if you come in with a serious gash that is bleeding that you will be given proiority treatment as you will not.
 

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Yes, sharp blade is critical.

I second the bow saw. Again, with a sharp blade. I've used them extensively to trim limbs. Quick, easy, no fuel, no cord, no charging.

Another handy tool is my electric pole saw. I bought a cheap model for one quick job, and was amazed how well it worked. I've since found lots of uses for it, and have loaned it out a couple of times. I just buy a new blade when the old one gets dull. They're cheap and it's usually only used briefly, so they last quite a while.
 

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I use an adjustable Echo two-stroke pole saw. Pretty much the same as the Stihl except that for non-commercial use the Echo has a 2-year warranty whereas with Stihl it is only 6 months.

I also have this 20v pole saw and the same battery and charger works with a Black & Decker trimmer and with my Chapman powered backpack sprayer. For limbs up to 5 inches it works very well and no issues with battery life and it holds a charge for month, only it is too short at times which is why I also have the Echo 2-stroke pole saw that extends to 13 feet with its 12 inch bar.

I have more than 40 oaks on my property so it has been worthwhile to have the various chain saws. For small jobs with limbs less than 4 inches in diameter I use a 18v reciprocating saw with one of the pruning blades.

There are electric chain saws but to get their rated output you need a large gauge extension cord.



https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004JMZH1C/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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I would opt for a battery powered chain saw. If you go that route, go with a system that has weed eaters, hedge trimmers, blowers etc. available to use with the same battery.
I have a friend who has a small farm and he can get an hour of cutting with his battery chainsaw and about 2 hours with the weed eater. I think it's the way to go since you don't have to mess with oil. Pick up a spare chain unless you can sharpen it yourself.
 
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I have a 260 Stihl sitting in the garage, but I find that my chain saw attachment for my gas string trimmer is the best go to saw unless you are felling big trees.

Even has an extension.

Easier on your back, safer for inexperienced operators and the chains are only $9.

I bought the extension for the string trimmer a few years ago, and at that time I think it was $69. I think they run around $89 now.
 
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