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Discussion Starter #1
I asked this elsewhere on here, but didn't get any feedback, so I'm hoping I can get some in this section.

I recently bought some vintage 2'x4' ceiling tins to put up on the kitchen ceiling. I'll be doing about 120sqft of ceiling. I've looked online and places like This Old House and a few others suggest putting up 1/2" plywood to nail the tins to, but that seems like an awful lot of extra work.

Is there any reason, I can't build a T Post with 2x4's, I've done this to support drywall when installing on ceiling. Then take a piece of scrap ply that is roughly the same dimensions as the tin to put between the tin and the T post, then coat the back of the tin with something like F26 or Liquid Nails, put the tin in place, then secure it until dry with the T post.

Not sure if that sounds like a lot of work and a very time consuming install, but I have to wire brush the loose paint and filth off each sheet of tin, then poly them to give them a nice shine and let them dry. There is no way I'll sit down and do all of them at once, so figure, I could clean a few, get them installed and drying while I work on the another and continue.

My other thought if that is a bad idea it to cut a bunch of furring strips and just space them as needed. I realize with the adhesive, they'll be a PIA to take down, but I don't ever plan to do that. The ceiling is 1915 lathe and plaster and it's in fairly good condition. Years ago, when I did construction I know if we glued a board to concrete, the bond wasn't coming loose, it would be the concrete or the board, so it seems like it should hold for years and years and years.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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I saw your first post, was hoping that a more experienced hand might answer it.

I am thinking that due to expansion and contraction in materials from season to season, that your glue idea is not going to work.

The tin will move different than the plaster and probably buckle the tin, or rip something that you don't want torn.

So I would use 1X furring strips and nails to put this up.

You can still do it in stages as you described, a little now, then a little more, until you finish.

Plan and plot out your placement first, because you don't want an unsightly cut or seam right out in plain sight.


ED
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Have the Tin in hand and have some plywood in 12" wide strips, ready to rip thinner.

I bought 1/2" ply for the job and I believe it's 3, if not 4 ply. It was 1 bar if that makes a difference....it had 1 more layer than the other one they had on hand. The tin is 2'x4' sheets, with the pattern being 1'x1' squares.

I really don't want to sheet my entire ceiling in plywood and I'm a bit worried about sound if I do that, so I'm planning on ripping the plywood down to 3" wide strips. To help deaden sound off the tin, I'm planning on 'gluing' up some 1/2" rigid foam in the spaces between the furring strips. When I install the tin, I'll likely use caulk or adhesive to help adhere the tin to the foam so the sound transfers through instead of off.

My question at this point is how to attach the tin? I read somewhere about using a brad nailer and nailing every 6". Being as this is vintage tin, there are holes where it was nailed before, I'm betting they used a sort of panel nail with a head about 1/16".
Is one better than the other? Obviously with the brad nailer I don't have to hammer overhead.... How long of nails should I use? I'm guessing 1/2-3/4" would suffice or should I go longer in hopes of penetrating the plaster a bit, or will they likely not penetrate, so stay shorter on the nails?

Any thoughts here? Any reason not to run the 3" plywood strips 12" on center and fill the gaps with the foam to help deaden sound?
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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I would use the shorter nails, the reason being, if a longer nail should crack the plaster, you will have another thing that needs fixed before finishing this. Plaster is brittle, and will fall out in big chunks if it cracks.

You could just as easily use foam carpet padding as a sound proofer if you wanted to, and have less mess cutting it than the Styrofoam.

That ceiling tin was designed to use the existing nail holes, with a small headed nail, and if your brads do not have much head they might not hold well.

Plan sounds feasible overall.


ED
 

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ceiling3.JPG

I put up tin ceiling tile in our kitchen. I had many problems using glue to be gin with. Ended up putting ½: plywood over the ceiling and using round headed brads to attach the tiles to the plywood. I bought a Ryobi Palm Nailer to put the brads into the the tile. I ended up pre-drilling the holes for the brads. The palm nailer kept me from denting the tiles.
 
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