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I purchased a vanity "kit" and am now installing it. It says to use a "proper adhesive" for bonding the granite top to the wood vanity. It does not state any more clearly what I should use to bond the two. This may be a stupid question, but can I use "Gorilla Glue"? It lists many uses, including securing floor tiles. If not, what should I use? Thanks!!
 

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No. Gorrilla Glue is a rigid adhesive, and it'll probably crack if bumped, or as the wood expands and contracts. Use a flexible adhesive, like silicone caulk. Silicone will be removable later, and will hold the granite top in place. If you really wanted it to never budge, you could use liquid nails construction adhesive.
 

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Silicone works well, the last stuff I used was the latex version, and it seems to be doing it's job!
 

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Sikabond construction adhesive. It's not with all the other caulk, silicon, and adhesives. It's in the construction section.
 

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I've been less than impressed with Gorilla glue. Unless tightly clamped, it tends to foam up and expand, resulting in a VERY weak bond. Look like I am not alone - in a recent test of glues for woodworking application run by IIRC, Fine WoodWorking, consistently placed Gorilla at the very bottom.

I recommend THIS. Good stuff.
 

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I've been less than impressed with Gorilla glue. Unless tightly clamped, it tends to foam up and expand, resulting in a VERY weak bond. Look like I am not alone - in a recent test of glues for woodworking application run by IIRC, Fine WoodWorking, consistently placed Gorilla at the very bottom.

I recommend THIS. Good stuff.
And I Quore from the Gorilla glue Website:

"Clamp It: You must clamp the two surfaces together tightly. Make sure the clamping pressure is distributed evenly across the surface. Or, if you don’t have a clamp, use heavy objects to achieve the clamping pressure. For lighter objects, try using a rubber band to hold the pieces together tightly. Clamp objects for 1-2 hours for Gorilla Glue and just 30-60 minutes for Gorilla Glue fast curing formula. For best results, leave overnight. "

http://www.gorillaglue.com/home/gorilla-glue/directions.aspx

I Like the stuff.... works great with oily exotics..........
 

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I agree that Gorilla Glue works well for the right applications, but I think it's funny how many people got the impression that it's "the best glue for EVERY application"! I think it must be that their advertising was a little too convincing/boastful. The glue is great for woodworking where yellow glue doesn't hold well, but of COURSE you have to clamp it!

The bottom line is that no glue does it all. Silicone, Construction adhesive, yellow glue, epoxy, Gorilla, etc . . . each has it's place.

And I Quore from the Gorilla glue Website:

"Clamp It: You must clamp the two surfaces together tightly. Make sure the clamping pressure is distributed evenly across the surface. Or, if you don’t have a clamp, use heavy objects to achieve the clamping pressure. For lighter objects, try using a rubber band to hold the pieces together tightly. Clamp objects for 1-2 hours for Gorilla Glue and just 30-60 minutes for Gorilla Glue fast curing formula. For best results, leave overnight. "

http://www.gorillaglue.com/home/gorilla-glue/directions.aspx

I Like the stuff.... works great with oily exotics..........
 
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