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Old School
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3,634 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Are you rich?

Do you have an excess of money? Then this post is not for you.

I’m going to tell you about an ancient leveling tool, and how to achieve much more accuracy and versatility in your leveling than a carpenter’s level, or even a laser level, can even come close to matching.

And this tool can even transfer level marks around the back sides of blind walls... where you can’t even see at all!

To top it all off, this amazing tool costs almost nothing. Really! Ten bucks or so.

And it is easily set up and used by only one person.

Perhaps some of you have already guessed that this wonder tool is the age-old Water Level.

I own many levels. I have even used multi thousand dollar Theodolites. But I still have a water level in my truck. And, other than the Theodolite, it is the most accurate of all instruments I use.

Please take the time to click on THIS SITE, and read about a tool you can have in your possession that will leave you laughing at the struggles and inaccuracies of your friends trying to do layouts with a laser level. And you won’t have spent two week’s pay on yours.
 

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Licensed P.E./Home Insp
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757 Posts
Willie,
I use that all of the time. It's especially useful in and around your yard for getting pitch and elevations. I use a 100' length of soft tygon tubing.
 

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Registered User
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11,730 Posts
Willie, that is funny. I actually had it already book-marked. I started as a Union carpenter in '73, framing houses alone in '75. I needed to set elevations on decks and read a '50's popular Science Mag. on water levels, built one that day. Everyone should have one. I used golf tees to keep the water in.The attached can is invaluable to keep the water (with food coloring) from exiting while moving locations. Be safe, G
 

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Old School
Joined
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3,634 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Well, although I just might deny it if sober when questioned about this... In my earliest days, back around '65, before I discovered water levels, and long before I could afford a decent dumpy, I used to stack up a few concrete blocks in the middle of a lot, place my 4' level on the stack, and using wood shims to work it into a horizontal level position, sight down it like a rifle to set batter boards.

That's kind of embarrassing to admit today. :whistling2:
 
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