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I am about to enclose a chicken coop. See attached photo. The enclosed portion of the coop/run is approximately 5.5' W x 5.5' H x 4.5' D. The plywood base in the photo is the floor of the coop.

There are 4 corner studs, an "H" frame of 2x4s to support a nesting box which will be accessible from the outside, and a single extra stud on one side near where the entrance/exit door for the hens will be. Two sides only have corner studs.

The design calls for one of the stud-free sides to be a door for cleaning the coop. The other stud-free side (as well as the nest box side) will have a 2' x 1' hinged window.

I was going to enclose it with 1/2" rough pine shiplap sheathing but that was nixed by my wife.

She wants horizontal cedar siding with some trim. So my question is what is the best way to do that?
1) Apply 1/2" to 5/8" ply first with no added studs, then roofing felt, then the cedar?
2) Or should I add one extra stud (in the middle) on the two sides that have none--and horizontal bracing I guess for the windows--and then nail the cedar to the studs with no underlayment? I'm a bit worried the interior of the coop might be too cold in the winter without any sheathing. Also, worried that the wide stud spacing won't secure the siding well enough.

Any ideas are appreciated.
 

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I would do your first option, maybe use 3/4, just sheath it with plywood, felt, then shingles. I'm not a carpenter, but I think it'll hold the shingles just fine. I don't know where you're located, but I sheathed mine with a T1-11 type material directly to studs, and our hens have made it through some pretty cold (single digit) nights. Just give them some black oil sunflower seeds in the evening and they'll tough it out, depending on the breeds.

Another suggestion is to use something like Flex Seal on the floor, so all the chicken crap (and there will be a lot of it) doesn't seep too quickly through the floor.

And beware of chicken math.... It's where your wife says you're going to have six chickens, then you end up with 23...
 

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Plywood will help keep everything square and plumb. 7/16 ply or osb is the norm. Then felt. Then window and door trim, corner trim, frieze trim, siding is last and goes between all the trim. Other than that, without knowing what you are envisioning the rest doesnt make much sense. Siding and trim have to be nailed into a stud. If your corner trim goes on and the siding doesnt have a stud next to the trim, it's only being nailed to the sheathing and you will have nails sticking out inside.
 
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