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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’m dealing with various messes from PO and came across a saddle cable that wouldn’t shut off. Took it off to replace and found a drilled hole, probably 1/4 in, in the pipe under it. Makes sense why it wouldn’t shut off.
Is there a way to close off that hole without soldering or SharkBite? I don’t don’t want push in connectors because they restrict flow and it’s a very tight spot to solder in a connector.
651647
 

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Looks like they heated the copper pipe up and bent it into position. Very common back in the old days. I've seen that a lot in older homes.

Half fast made some good suggestions.

It is a tight spot for soldering unless you want to re-do that section of pipe with the proper fittings, then it would be possible.

So your options are; hack it, sharkbtye or re-do a section of pipe. Your call.
 

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Interesting. I don't think I have seen that before.
Yes, it's very old school. That was probably done in the 50's 60's time period

Back in the old days, plumbers would use whatever they had available on their truck or improvise if they didn't have the fittings, etc. No big box/hardware/plumbing supply stores around the corner you could run to if you were out of supplies back then.
 

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Big Dog
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The pipe looks pretty bad.

I advocate a proper repair over a hack patch.

Perhaps its the angle of the picture but it looks like if you cut out the bad section out to put in a coupler, one end is going to hit the bend preventing the coupler from seating properly.

If there is room to solder above the bend, I would cut out the bend entirely and solder in 2 couplers with an elbow. If you are careful with your measurements, you could solder the elbow to the 2 stub pipes on the ground, then connect it to the main pipe and only have to solder the couplings.

To protect the surrounding wood from potential fire while soldering, you can use a soldering heat shield available at most home centers for about $15.
 
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It is hard to tell what you have. I tried to find what a saddle cable is and had no luck. If the pipe is straight enough you could try the method below.

Trade tip
Patching holes in copper pipes
"Providing you can drain the pipe, patch pin-prick holes in copper pipes with a blob of solder.
You can repair larger holes or accidental cuts in a similar way, by soldering on a patch made from a half-section of copper pipe bent to shape.
In both cases, make sure you clean and flux the mating surfaces before applying the solder or it won’t ‘take. Leave the joint to cool before testing."

patching holes in copper pipes

Fill a small hole (above left) with a blob of solder. Polish the pipe with steel wool first, smear on some flux, then gently melt the solder over the hole.

For a larger hole, (above right) heat the fluxed pipe and melt on solder to cover the damaged area. Then position the fluxed patch, heat again, and feed in more solder.
 
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