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1 Foot in the Grave
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102 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My landlord is also my oldest and dearest friend and he lets me do whatever I want. I recently remodeled the kitchen/living area and will be starting the bedroom soon.

There's one wall that is the common wall with the apartment next door and there's no insulation. Temperature isn't the problem, but sound sure is. Currently there's a young person with an active social life living there and I don't really wanna hear it.

My plan is to remove the sheetrock from my side of the wall and put some sound deadening material there. My research tells me that a product called Roxul Safe'n'Sound™ is what I should give serious consideration into using.

I hope some of you have some experience with the product and can offer your opinion. One of my concerns is the dust and fiber aspect of the raw material. I have late stage Emphysema and am on oxygen 24/7. I can work for short periods of time (for instance, the 2 week remodel of the main room took me 8 months ;)) and I don't mind wearing a respirator, but it's difficult.

Please don't suggest hiring someone. I can't afford that. My only choices will be do it carefully, or don't do it at all. I'd like you to share your experience with handling the product so I can make that decision.

The wall is about 12' long and 8' tall. If I can manage that project, I will prob'ly do the bathroom wall at a later date - it's also about 12x8'. I have some experience. I have done a bit of new and remodel construction over the years and did flooring for 35 years.

Best R'gards,

Jim
 

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1 Foot in the Grave
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102 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Skuce, but what about the other properties? Does it have a lot of loose fiber and dust like the pink stuff? That's my main concern.

R'gards,

Jim
 

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132 Posts
If you are going to go through the trouble of ripping down dry wall and installing Roxul, you might also want to look into sound deadening drywall that is equal to I believe 8 layers of drywall with their different layer of films within the thickness. I watched an episode of Holmes on Homes when neighbors in your situation were having the same problems.
 

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Heritage Restoration
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73 Posts
It's a lot nicer to work with. It's not picky and doesn't fall apart like Pink. It also doesn't turn to crap if it somehow gets wet.

I swore off using Pink probably 10 years ago now.
 

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Out of all the mineral wools Roxul is the nicest one to work with. It can be a bit prickly and dusty though why don't you suggest to your young neighbor that they give you a hand installing it otherwise get a really good respirator
 
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