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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick question about the proper use of angle valves, AKA shut off valves under sinks. I am trying to reduce my water bill and think that I can save a bunch of gallons used by decreasing the volume of water flowing through my common used faucets. Right now the pressure is so great that when I turn on the kitchen and bathroom faucets, the amount of water coming out is unnecessary and habit is preventing me from just opening the faucet less. So is it safe or recommended to have my shut off valves half open to reduce volume? It seems to work well for reducing volume, but I am not sure how safe this is for the valves. Any thoughts or experiences will be appreciated.
 

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Angle stops are considered full open valves, not for volume control though its done often.
 

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Why not just lower the pressure if it's to high?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well I am currently renting this house and I am not sure of an easy way to reduce the pressure. I like the pressure for the toilets and showers, but I don't need to rip my skin off when washing my hands. That is why i thought the shut off valves would be a good route. What are the risks to using the shut off valves to reduce volume?
 

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No risks ----might make noise---biggest risk is the old valve leaking the moment you turn it---

Consider changing the aireators to a flow restricted one---
 

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while everybody has good suggestions....the proper fix is installing a pressure reducing valve....not just to save water,volume, or money.....its protecting the property for major damage due to line burst because pressure is to high...btw whats too high....how much is it did anyone put a guage on it ..ben sr.
 

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The old multi-turn stops should not be used to choke the flow down. They aren't designed for it and the rubber washer inside can rattle, moan, and make noise as it shreds itself. Soon the washer is toast, and it won't shut the water off when you need it to.

The newer quarter-turn stops, assuming they are like a ball valve internally, could probably withstand being choked down. Gonna be hard to find that sweet spot between "too little" and "too much" flow though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I actually just installed quarter turn valves because when I went to shut off the valves they leaked incredibly. I am guessing that they were 20 years old. So after spending money on replacing the valves, I don't want to do anything that would cause the new ones to leak. Maybe a water saving aerator is a good option. Will the quarter turn valves get damaged quickly if they are shut half the way?

Thanks for all the answers.
 

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I actually just installed quarter turn valves because when I went to shut off the valves they leaked incredibly. I am guessing that they were 20 years old. So after spending money on replacing the valves, I don't want to do anything that would cause the new ones to leak. Maybe a water saving aerator is a good option. Will the quarter turn valves get damaged quickly if they are shut half the way?

Thanks for all the answers.
PRESSURE REDUCING VALVE....ben sr
 
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