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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Our new home, built in 1938, has what I assume is plaster walls with wood lath behind it. The bathroom walls had a bunch of small holes, cracks, etc. in the plaster that were just left to get worse. My mother in law tried to hide it with that stick-on fake tile you use for backsplashes, but you could very plainly see the cracks through it, so today we pulled it off. And it took a bunch of plaster and paint with it (never making that stupid mistake again). I'm not sure what's up with the paint but it was already peeling in areas. I scraped any super loose paint off before applying the patches. I do have wire brushes and scrapers but I'd like to know if I could possibly fill the chips with mud and sand instead of physically removing all of the paint...

I patched the holes with premixed patch material. It came in a small tub. My plan is to let it dry for 24 hours, sand it all down with 220 grit sandpaper, then apply drywall mud (I got Sheetrock brand all-purpose lightweight powder that you mix with water) to both the patches and the shallow areas left by the chipped paint. Let that dry for 24 hours, sand, apply another coat of mud, prime both walls fully, then paint.

Is that a good plan? I've never done this before. The house isn't perfect and never will be, but I would like this to at least turn out better than it was before. I have the bucket, mud powder, trowel, taping blade, and a mixing blade for the drill to mix the mud up in preparation for tomorrow.

Photos of the walls. The last photo includes the main problem area, there was a huge Y-shaped crack under the sink from the previous owner. We dug out all the loose plaster away from the crack and filled it in.
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Discussion Starter #2
Well, the big patched area under the sink started cracking a bit because I applied it too thick. I'll have to sand it down and fill it in tomorrow. Oops.

Thankfully I think the rest are drying correctly. Not bad for my first time patching walls, I guess...

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Discussion Starter #4
Has the paint been tested for lead?
I can't find it right now, but there was a document signed by the seller that said there was no lead paint, to their knowledge. They owned the house for over 50 years (house had 2 owners and we're the 3rd). I will get a lead test kit but at this point we've already chipped away at the walls and patched them. And they will need sanding :/ I purchased water-based primer and water-based wall paint to paint over the existing stuff.

I'm not an expert by any means, but my guess is the blue paint is peeling because they painted the walls with latex-based over oil-based, or something. It's peeling off, rather than flaking/alligatoring. The kitchen and bathroom were renovated in the 90s.

I'll get a lead test kit before I start sanding anything. Hoping it's okay and we can finish the bathroom. Otherwise we might call in a drywall guy and just put new drywall up over both walls, instead of messing with them any further.
 

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Well, a couple things......you really should use the powdered JC mix for your first coat or two. It dries hard and fast. Then you topcoat with pre-mixed JC. By using the powdered stuff, you can get two coats done in a day. Also, pre-mixed in the tub is far easier to sand. It's next to impossible to sand the powdered JC.

For a final coat you want to feather it out a bit so those patches don't show up during the painting stage.
 
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
All the articles I read said to either never use premixed because it's too soft, or never use/do this that or the other thing. So I didn't get a clear answer on what to actually use. So I kinda just bought what I thought would work.

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Lead test didn't show anything. So I think we're safe to start sanding the patches and then start putting layers of JC on. The premixed patch stuff I bought says it's low dust.

Well, I just read the bucket of JC I bought, and it's premixed lol. So I guess I did buy the right top coat stuff at least!

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
First coat of JC is on. Covered the paint chips very well. And I don't think I did too bad on the large patches. They're becoming even with the wall. I'm hoping one or two more coats will suffice. Maybe by the weekend I'll have primer on the walls.


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Looks good! Now you can add another DIY skill to your overall skill set.
 

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Well, a couple things......you really should use the powdered JC mix for your first coat or two. It dries hard and fast.
It SETS hard and fast, it doesn't dry fast. Everything needs to be dry before sanding. And there shouldn't be any need to sand before you're all done, but if you do sand before finishing, there is definitely no reason to use grit as fine as 220. I wouldn't use anything finer than 150 even after the final coat, if I'm finishing with a roller.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have two 220 grit dust channeling sponges already, so I'll use those until I either get tired or go back to the hardware store lol. Thanks for the advice! I'll be putting JC coat 2 on later today. Hoping that'll be the last one I need.

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